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I don't have a clue?!!!?

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: greenostrich452 | Category: Bodycare business plan

In poetry , metre ( meter in US spelling ) is the basic rhythmic structure of a verse or lines in verse. Many traditional verse forms prescribe a specific verse metre, or a certain set of metres alternating in a particular order. The study and the actual use of metres and forms of versification are both known as prosody. (Within linguistics , " prosody " is used in a more general sense that includes not only poetic metre but also the rhythmic aspects of prose , whether formal or informal, that vary from language to language, and sometimes between poetic traditions.)

The metre of most poetry of the Western world and elsewhere is based on patterns of syllables of particular types. The familiar type of metre in English-language poetry is called qualitative metre , with stressed syllables coming at regular intervals (e.g. in iambic pentameters , usually every even-numbered syllable). Many Romance languages use a scheme that is somewhat similar but where the position of only one particular stressed syllable (e.g. the last) needs to be fixed. The metre of the old Germanic poetry of languages such as Old Norse and Old English was radically different, but was still based on stress patterns.

Comments
  1. author
    whitegoose632 18 Jan 2017 00:38

    In poetry , metre ( meter in US spelling ) is the basic rhythmic structure of a verse or lines in verse. Many traditional verse forms prescribe a specific verse metre, or a certain set of metres alternating in a particular order. The study and the actual use of metres and forms of versification are both known as prosody. (Within linguistics , " prosody " is used in a more general sense that includes not only poetic metre but also the rhythmic aspects of prose , whether formal or informal, that vary from language to language, and sometimes between poetic traditions.)

    Finally, non-stressed languages that have little or no differentiation of syllable length, such as French or Chinese, base their verses on the number of syllables only. The most common form in French is the Alexandrine , with twelve syllables a verse, and in classical Chinese five characters, and thus five syllables. But since each Chinese character is pronounced using one syllable in a certain tone , classical Chinese poetry also had more strictly defined rules, such as parallelism or antithesis between lines.

  2. author
    blackladybug663 18 Jan 2017 06:09

    In poetry , metre ( meter in US spelling ) is the basic rhythmic structure of a verse or lines in verse. Many traditional verse forms prescribe a specific verse metre, or a certain set of metres alternating in a particular order. The study and the actual use of metres and forms of versification are both known as prosody. (Within linguistics , " prosody " is used in a more general sense that includes not only poetic metre but also the rhythmic aspects of prose , whether formal or informal, that vary from language to language, and sometimes between poetic traditions.)

    Finally, non-stressed languages that have little or no differentiation of syllable length, such as French or Chinese, base their verses on the number of syllables only. The most common form in French is the Alexandrine , with twelve syllables a verse, and in classical Chinese five characters, and thus five syllables. But since each Chinese character is pronounced using one syllable in a certain tone , classical Chinese poetry also had more strictly defined rules, such as parallelism or antithesis between lines.

    An acrostic where the first letter of every word or verse follows the order of the alphabet. For example, in the sentence A B ear C limbed D own , the first letter of every word is in alphabetical order: A, B, C, D.

    A story or picture with two or more different meanings–a literal meaning and one or more symbolic meanings. The setting, characters, and things that happen inside an allegory are symbols for ideas or qualities.

    A character that can be seen as an archetype is often referred to as a "stock character." This character regularly appears in literary works and is often assigned typical attributes commonly associated with that type of character. For example: The wicked witch in a fairy tale, the damsel in distress.

    Archetypes can be characters or structures. Most often they are referenced as character types (hero, villain, sage, villain-hero, tragic hero, etc), but archetypes can also be structural patterns within a literary framework. Examples of structural archetypes include the quest, the fall, the journey, and the ritual story lines. Ultimately, an archetype is merely a recognizable pattern and can be applied to thematic elements, plot sequences, and character types.

    Poetry (the term derives from a variant of the Greek term, poiesis , "making") is a form of literature that uses aesthetic and rhythmic [1] [2] [3] qualities of language —such as phonaesthetics , sound symbolism , and metre —to evoke meanings in addition to, or in place of, the prosaic ostensible meaning.

    Some scholars believe that the art of poetry may predate literacy. [8] Others, however, suggest that poetry did not necessarily predate writing. [9]

  3. author
    ticklishfrog277 18 Jan 2017 00:05

    hook--what makes your reader want to keep reading intro--where the hook is usually located--states the purpose of your essay and tells a little bit about what you intend to say for example if someone was writing a paper on cats a good hook might be: "Cats, long believed to be the ultimate loner pet may actually be the most emotionally needy of all small mammals." This hook is unexpected and you don t know the answer already--it makes you curious enough to read more. The intro would probably go on to tell about new studies showing that cats need more attention etc.. hope that helps.

  4. author
    brownlion560 17 Jan 2017 22:48

    In poetry , metre ( meter in US spelling ) is the basic rhythmic structure of a verse or lines in verse. Many traditional verse forms prescribe a specific verse metre, or a certain set of metres alternating in a particular order. The study and the actual use of metres and forms of versification are both known as prosody. (Within linguistics , " prosody " is used in a more general sense that includes not only poetic metre but also the rhythmic aspects of prose , whether formal or informal, that vary from language to language, and sometimes between poetic traditions.)

    Finally, non-stressed languages that have little or no differentiation of syllable length, such as French or Chinese, base their verses on the number of syllables only. The most common form in French is the Alexandrine , with twelve syllables a verse, and in classical Chinese five characters, and thus five syllables. But since each Chinese character is pronounced using one syllable in a certain tone , classical Chinese poetry also had more strictly defined rules, such as parallelism or antithesis between lines.

    An acrostic where the first letter of every word or verse follows the order of the alphabet. For example, in the sentence A B ear C limbed D own , the first letter of every word is in alphabetical order: A, B, C, D.

    A story or picture with two or more different meanings–a literal meaning and one or more symbolic meanings. The setting, characters, and things that happen inside an allegory are symbols for ideas or qualities.

  5. author
    beautifulduck678 18 Jan 2017 00:34

    In poetry , metre ( meter in US spelling ) is the basic rhythmic structure of a verse or lines in verse. Many traditional verse forms prescribe a specific verse metre, or a certain set of metres alternating in a particular order. The study and the actual use of metres and forms of versification are both known as prosody. (Within linguistics , " prosody " is used in a more general sense that includes not only poetic metre but also the rhythmic aspects of prose , whether formal or informal, that vary from language to language, and sometimes between poetic traditions.)

    Finally, non-stressed languages that have little or no differentiation of syllable length, such as French or Chinese, base their verses on the number of syllables only. The most common form in French is the Alexandrine , with twelve syllables a verse, and in classical Chinese five characters, and thus five syllables. But since each Chinese character is pronounced using one syllable in a certain tone , classical Chinese poetry also had more strictly defined rules, such as parallelism or antithesis between lines.

    An acrostic where the first letter of every word or verse follows the order of the alphabet. For example, in the sentence A B ear C limbed D own , the first letter of every word is in alphabetical order: A, B, C, D.

    A story or picture with two or more different meanings–a literal meaning and one or more symbolic meanings. The setting, characters, and things that happen inside an allegory are symbols for ideas or qualities.

    A character that can be seen as an archetype is often referred to as a "stock character." This character regularly appears in literary works and is often assigned typical attributes commonly associated with that type of character. For example: The wicked witch in a fairy tale, the damsel in distress.

    Archetypes can be characters or structures. Most often they are referenced as character types (hero, villain, sage, villain-hero, tragic hero, etc), but archetypes can also be structural patterns within a literary framework. Examples of structural archetypes include the quest, the fall, the journey, and the ritual story lines. Ultimately, an archetype is merely a recognizable pattern and can be applied to thematic elements, plot sequences, and character types.

  6. author
    Инфометр 18 Jan 2017 06:21

  7. author
    brownsnake635 18 Jan 2017 08:38

    Expert Reviewed. wiki How to Write a Paper for College Literature Classes. Seven Parts: Analyzing the Text and Developing a Thesis Outlining Your Essay Drafting Your.