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How much of a comparative essay is the analysis part?

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: lazyfrog910 | Category: Latin american revolution essay

The main character Emily Grierson, is defiantly odd by any average reader's values, thus a character analysis could go in many different directions. It is pretty much impossible to inspect her in a mental as well as contextual light. Over the course of the story, Emily's unpredictable and odd behavior becomes very weird. The townspeople (as well as the reader) are left trying to explain how Emily was able to sleep next to the corpse of Homer Barron for so many years and think nothing of it. Now the narrator tells us that the townspeople did not say she was crazy (Faulkner 78), and of course, she had never gone to a doctor for mental issues, so they had no way of thinking she was. However by the story's close, the reader can go back through the story and spot several episodes in which Emily's character and actions hinted at the chance of a mental illness, even if the town wanted to ignore these and think or her as a social idol. It's reasonable to think that Emily developed a mental illness as a response to the demanding conditions as a Southern woman from an aristocratic family. While growing up she obviously didn't develop normal coping and defensive mechanisms. Things that most people could handle, she couldn't, and her mental state got worse over time.

Emily lived many years as a loner; she withdrew from her community to live in isolation. The story skips a lot over time to different parts in her life, She was sick for a long time. When we saw her again… (Faulkner 78) When we next saw Miss Emily… (Faulkner 80). Faulkner tries to characterize Emily's seclusion through her actions. When her father died a lot of time passed till we saw her again, and when her relationship ended, again more time passed before we saw her again. Even though her father was a main key in her seclusion, her southern pride didn't help either. None of the young men were quite good enough for Miss Emily and such. (Faulkner 77). She felt that she was above socializing with others in the community. If her father hadn't of scared off every man who tried to court her, Emily wouldn't have gone insane.

Comments
  1. author
    coco* 18 Jan 2017 04:48

    Order essay here comparative analysis essays on a rose

    The main character Emily Grierson, is defiantly odd by any average reader''s values, thus a character analysis could go in many different directions. It is pretty much impossible to inspect her in a mental as well as contextual light. Over the course of the story, Emily''s unpredictable and odd behavior becomes very weird. The townspeople (as well as the reader) are left trying to explain how Emily was able to sleep next to the corpse of Homer Barron for so many years and think nothing of it. Now the narrator tells us that the townspeople did not say she was crazy (Faulkner 78), and of course, she had never gone to a doctor for mental issues, so they had no way of thinking she was. However by the story''s close, the reader can go back through the story and spot several episodes in which Emily''s character and actions hinted at the chance of a mental illness, even if the town wanted to ignore these and think or her as a social idol. It''s reasonable to think that Emily developed a mental illness as a response to the demanding conditions as a Southern woman from an aristocratic family. While growing up she obviously didn''t develop normal coping and defensive mechanisms. Things that most people could handle, she couldn''t, and her mental state got worse over time.

    Emily lived many years as a loner; she withdrew from her community to live in isolation. The story skips a lot over time to different parts in her life, She was sick for a long time. When we saw her again… (Faulkner 78) When we next saw Miss Emily… (Faulkner 80). Faulkner tries to characterize Emily''s seclusion through her actions. When her father died a lot of time passed till we saw her again, and when her relationship ended, again more time passed before we saw her again. Even though her father was a main key in her seclusion, her southern pride didn''t help either. None of the young men were quite good enough for Miss Emily and such. (Faulkner 77). She felt that she was above socializing with others in the community. If her father hadn''t of scared off every man who tried to court her, Emily wouldn''t have gone insane.

  2. author
    brownwolf880 17 Jan 2017 22:22

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/axd48 While race is relevant in the reality of the situation, that should not be the focus in a comparison of these two works. What is important is the alienation & exploitation involved in both cases, their subordination to an Anglo-centric majority. In the case of the Aborigines, like the Amerinds, they inhabited a land that was invaded & conquered. They were then reduced to a "second class" status, viewed, quite frankly, as an "inconvenience" by the British/Irish convicts (& their wardens) who became "Australians." Africans, on the other hand, were imported to work as slaves in the Americas. (Few were "kidnapped" by Europeans or Americans. Most were purchased from other Africans or Arab slave traders. But that is another story. As are the cases of "white slaves," black slave owners, & freeman.) Back to the question: Both peoples are examples of the "alienated," the Aborigines from a new society that had been imposed upon them in their native land, the Africans from a strange society into which they had been forcibly introduced. In both cases, of course, the authors are dealing with the descendants of the original "alienated" people. And that is the common thread that runs through the work of both authors.

  3. author
    goldenswan793 18 Jan 2017 01:44

    Comparative Analysis Essay

  4. author
    User1488464630 18 Jan 2017 08:02

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