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SparkNotes: Othello: Analysis of Major Characters

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: heavypanda230 | Category: Resume design engineer mechanical

Analyze. An essay on the theme of a book is a synthesis of your reflections on elements of the story and their relationship to a deeper and broader meaning.

Comments
  1. author
    yellowwolf135 18 Jan 2017 01:59

    The analysis for sections 46-52 states that "Darl’s burning of the barn does hasten reconciliation between Darl and Jewel." This couldn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be more untrue. As Jewel retrieves the casket from the fire, he lets out a blood curdling scream of "Darl!" already aware that it was he who set fire to the barn. After this, Jewel sits on the wagon and is said to glare at Darl like a bulldog waiting to pounce, and Jewel suggests to Anse that they should immediately tie Darl up to be taken to the asylum, even before their mother is buried. There neve

    One of the fifteen narrators. The youngest son of the family, and the second most frequently used narrator of the novel. Vardaman seems to teeter on the brink of mental collapse early on. His mother s death is extremely traumatizing, and his sensitive and imaginative nature is thrown out of balance by the event. He is at an age where he is becoming conscious of his status as a country boy (as opposed to a town boy), and he wonders why it should be so. He has a special bond with Darl.

    One of the fifteen narrators. Mother of the family. Gravely ill at the start of the novel, she dies early on. She has always wanted to be buried among her birth family in Jefferson. Once a schoolteacher, she married Anse and gave birth to four children by him: Cash, Darl, Dewey Dell, and Vardaman. She also had a secret affair with Whitfield, resulting in the birth of Jewel. The transport of her body is the main event of the novel.

    Anse narrates. Anse speaks of the misfortune of living near the road. He blames the bustle of the road for many misfortunes, including Cash s carpenter hopes, which lead to Cash falling off a roof and being unable to work for six months. He thinks the road has contributed to Addie s sickness. Vardaman returns, covered with blood from having cleaned the fish. Anse tells him to go wash up. Anse is weary.

    Darl narrates. He asks Jewel , repeatedly, if he realizes that Addie is going to die. He has bothered Dewey Dell, not out of malice but out of a strange detachment from how his words hurt her: he knew that Dewey Dell is pregnant, and that she is waiting for Addie to die so she can rush to town and find a pharmacist to help her have an abortion.

    This is perhaps one of Shakespeare''''s more interesting plays, if you will. In comparison to Macbeth it isn''''t quite the walk in the park.
    I think conceptually it enables the reader to see that characters can influence characters to such a degree that the original traits are masked and changed. Tragedy in this play is definitely a main component - and a great emphasis that perhaps the villain doesn''''t always find their true defeat. In a way, wasn''''t the "villain" successful? He lied to everyone and pretty much killed whomever got in his way.

    Before I begin expounding on this thought, let me first say that I am not a Shakespearean “Scholar”. I am just a teacher who loves teaching Shakespeare on the off-chance that one of my students will get bitten by the bug and want to study and read more of the man than just the set works that he or she has to cover for exam purposes.
    Having taught Othello to matric classes for the past 4 years, I have developed a few theories of my own about Shakespeare’s “bit” actors,. Read more

    Lady Macbeth, the strong-willed, persuasive, and charming wife of Macbeth. Ambitious for her husband’s glory, she finds herself unable to kill King Duncan in his sleep because he resembles her father. As Macbeth becomes more inhuman, she becomes remorseful and breaks under the strain. In her sleepwalking, she relives the events of the night of the king’s murder and tries to wash her hands clean of imaginary bloodstains.

    Banquo ( BAN -kwoh), Macbeth’s fellow commander. A man of noble character, seemingly unmoved by the prophecy of the Three Weird Sisters that he will beget kings, he is not completely innocent. He does not disclose his suspicions of Macbeth, and he accepts a place in Macbeth’s court. After being murdered by Macbeth’s assassins, Banquo appears at a ceremonial banquet. His blood-spattered ghost, visible only to Macbeth, unnerves the king completely. In the final vision shown to Macbeth by the Three Weird Sisters, Banquo and his line of kings appear.

  2. author
    tinykoala416 18 Jan 2017 03:02

    The analysis for sections 46-52 states that "Darl’s burning of the barn does hasten reconciliation between Darl and Jewel." This couldn''''t be more untrue. As Jewel retrieves the casket from the fire, he lets out a blood curdling scream of "Darl!" already aware that it was he who set fire to the barn. After this, Jewel sits on the wagon and is said to glare at Darl like a bulldog waiting to pounce, and Jewel suggests to Anse that they should immediately tie Darl up to be taken to the asylum, even before their mother is buried. There neve

    One of the fifteen narrators. The youngest son of the family, and the second most frequently used narrator of the novel. Vardaman seems to teeter on the brink of mental collapse early on. His mother s death is extremely traumatizing, and his sensitive and imaginative nature is thrown out of balance by the event. He is at an age where he is becoming conscious of his status as a country boy (as opposed to a town boy), and he wonders why it should be so. He has a special bond with Darl.

    One of the fifteen narrators. Mother of the family. Gravely ill at the start of the novel, she dies early on. She has always wanted to be buried among her birth family in Jefferson. Once a schoolteacher, she married Anse and gave birth to four children by him: Cash, Darl, Dewey Dell, and Vardaman. She also had a secret affair with Whitfield, resulting in the birth of Jewel. The transport of her body is the main event of the novel.

  3. author
    yellowtiger322 18 Jan 2017 06:18

    The analysis for sections 46-52 states that "Darl’s burning of the barn does hasten reconciliation between Darl and Jewel." This couldn''t be more untrue. As Jewel retrieves the casket from the fire, he lets out a blood curdling scream of "Darl!" already aware that it was he who set fire to the barn. After this, Jewel sits on the wagon and is said to glare at Darl like a bulldog waiting to pounce, and Jewel suggests to Anse that they should immediately tie Darl up to be taken to the asylum, even before their mother is buried. There neve

  4. author
    ледженд 18 Jan 2017 02:51

    The analysis for sections 46-52 states that "Darl’s burning of the barn does hasten reconciliation between Darl and Jewel." This couldn''''''''''''''''t be more untrue. As Jewel retrieves the casket from the fire, he lets out a blood curdling scream of "Darl!" already aware that it was he who set fire to the barn. After this, Jewel sits on the wagon and is said to glare at Darl like a bulldog waiting to pounce, and Jewel suggests to Anse that they should immediately tie Darl up to be taken to the asylum, even before their mother is buried. There neve

    One of the fifteen narrators. The youngest son of the family, and the second most frequently used narrator of the novel. Vardaman seems to teeter on the brink of mental collapse early on. His mother s death is extremely traumatizing, and his sensitive and imaginative nature is thrown out of balance by the event. He is at an age where he is becoming conscious of his status as a country boy (as opposed to a town boy), and he wonders why it should be so. He has a special bond with Darl.

    One of the fifteen narrators. Mother of the family. Gravely ill at the start of the novel, she dies early on. She has always wanted to be buried among her birth family in Jefferson. Once a schoolteacher, she married Anse and gave birth to four children by him: Cash, Darl, Dewey Dell, and Vardaman. She also had a secret affair with Whitfield, resulting in the birth of Jewel. The transport of her body is the main event of the novel.

    Anse narrates. Anse speaks of the misfortune of living near the road. He blames the bustle of the road for many misfortunes, including Cash s carpenter hopes, which lead to Cash falling off a roof and being unable to work for six months. He thinks the road has contributed to Addie s sickness. Vardaman returns, covered with blood from having cleaned the fish. Anse tells him to go wash up. Anse is weary.

    Darl narrates. He asks Jewel , repeatedly, if he realizes that Addie is going to die. He has bothered Dewey Dell, not out of malice but out of a strange detachment from how his words hurt her: he knew that Dewey Dell is pregnant, and that she is waiting for Addie to die so she can rush to town and find a pharmacist to help her have an abortion.

  5. author
    organiccat515 18 Jan 2017 06:58

    The analysis for sections 46-52 states that "Darl’s burning of the barn does hasten reconciliation between Darl and Jewel." This couldn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be more untrue. As Jewel retrieves the casket from the fire, he lets out a blood curdling scream of "Darl!" already aware that it was he who set fire to the barn. After this, Jewel sits on the wagon and is said to glare at Darl like a bulldog waiting to pounce, and Jewel suggests to Anse that they should immediately tie Darl up to be taken to the asylum, even before their mother is buried. There neve

    One of the fifteen narrators. The youngest son of the family, and the second most frequently used narrator of the novel. Vardaman seems to teeter on the brink of mental collapse early on. His mother s death is extremely traumatizing, and his sensitive and imaginative nature is thrown out of balance by the event. He is at an age where he is becoming conscious of his status as a country boy (as opposed to a town boy), and he wonders why it should be so. He has a special bond with Darl.

    One of the fifteen narrators. Mother of the family. Gravely ill at the start of the novel, she dies early on. She has always wanted to be buried among her birth family in Jefferson. Once a schoolteacher, she married Anse and gave birth to four children by him: Cash, Darl, Dewey Dell, and Vardaman. She also had a secret affair with Whitfield, resulting in the birth of Jewel. The transport of her body is the main event of the novel.

    Anse narrates. Anse speaks of the misfortune of living near the road. He blames the bustle of the road for many misfortunes, including Cash s carpenter hopes, which lead to Cash falling off a roof and being unable to work for six months. He thinks the road has contributed to Addie s sickness. Vardaman returns, covered with blood from having cleaned the fish. Anse tells him to go wash up. Anse is weary.

    Darl narrates. He asks Jewel , repeatedly, if he realizes that Addie is going to die. He has bothered Dewey Dell, not out of malice but out of a strange detachment from how his words hurt her: he knew that Dewey Dell is pregnant, and that she is waiting for Addie to die so she can rush to town and find a pharmacist to help her have an abortion.

    This is perhaps one of Shakespeare''s more interesting plays, if you will. In comparison to Macbeth it isn''t quite the walk in the park.
    I think conceptually it enables the reader to see that characters can influence characters to such a degree that the original traits are masked and changed. Tragedy in this play is definitely a main component - and a great emphasis that perhaps the villain doesn''t always find their true defeat. In a way, wasn''t the "villain" successful? He lied to everyone and pretty much killed whomever got in his way.

    Before I begin expounding on this thought, let me first say that I am not a Shakespearean “Scholar”. I am just a teacher who loves teaching Shakespeare on the off-chance that one of my students will get bitten by the bug and want to study and read more of the man than just the set works that he or she has to cover for exam purposes.
    Having taught Othello to matric classes for the past 4 years, I have developed a few theories of my own about Shakespeare’s “bit” actors,. Read more

  6. author
    smallmouse408 18 Jan 2017 08:03

    The analysis for sections 46-52 states that "Darl’s burning of the barn does hasten reconciliation between Darl and Jewel." This couldn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be more untrue. As Jewel retrieves the casket from the fire, he lets out a blood curdling scream of "Darl!" already aware that it was he who set fire to the barn. After this, Jewel sits on the wagon and is said to glare at Darl like a bulldog waiting to pounce, and Jewel suggests to Anse that they should immediately tie Darl up to be taken to the asylum, even before their mother is buried. There neve

    One of the fifteen narrators. The youngest son of the family, and the second most frequently used narrator of the novel. Vardaman seems to teeter on the brink of mental collapse early on. His mother s death is extremely traumatizing, and his sensitive and imaginative nature is thrown out of balance by the event. He is at an age where he is becoming conscious of his status as a country boy (as opposed to a town boy), and he wonders why it should be so. He has a special bond with Darl.

    One of the fifteen narrators. Mother of the family. Gravely ill at the start of the novel, she dies early on. She has always wanted to be buried among her birth family in Jefferson. Once a schoolteacher, she married Anse and gave birth to four children by him: Cash, Darl, Dewey Dell, and Vardaman. She also had a secret affair with Whitfield, resulting in the birth of Jewel. The transport of her body is the main event of the novel.

    Anse narrates. Anse speaks of the misfortune of living near the road. He blames the bustle of the road for many misfortunes, including Cash s carpenter hopes, which lead to Cash falling off a roof and being unable to work for six months. He thinks the road has contributed to Addie s sickness. Vardaman returns, covered with blood from having cleaned the fish. Anse tells him to go wash up. Anse is weary.

    Darl narrates. He asks Jewel , repeatedly, if he realizes that Addie is going to die. He has bothered Dewey Dell, not out of malice but out of a strange detachment from how his words hurt her: he knew that Dewey Dell is pregnant, and that she is waiting for Addie to die so she can rush to town and find a pharmacist to help her have an abortion.

  7. author
    crazydog552 18 Jan 2017 08:51

    The analysis for sections 46-52 states that "Darl’s burning of the barn does hasten reconciliation between Darl and Jewel." This couldn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be more untrue. As Jewel retrieves the casket from the fire, he lets out a blood curdling scream of "Darl!" already aware that it was he who set fire to the barn. After this, Jewel sits on the wagon and is said to glare at Darl like a bulldog waiting to pounce, and Jewel suggests to Anse that they should immediately tie Darl up to be taken to the asylum, even before their mother is buried. There neve

    One of the fifteen narrators. The youngest son of the family, and the second most frequently used narrator of the novel. Vardaman seems to teeter on the brink of mental collapse early on. His mother s death is extremely traumatizing, and his sensitive and imaginative nature is thrown out of balance by the event. He is at an age where he is becoming conscious of his status as a country boy (as opposed to a town boy), and he wonders why it should be so. He has a special bond with Darl.

    One of the fifteen narrators. Mother of the family. Gravely ill at the start of the novel, she dies early on. She has always wanted to be buried among her birth family in Jefferson. Once a schoolteacher, she married Anse and gave birth to four children by him: Cash, Darl, Dewey Dell, and Vardaman. She also had a secret affair with Whitfield, resulting in the birth of Jewel. The transport of her body is the main event of the novel.

    Anse narrates. Anse speaks of the misfortune of living near the road. He blames the bustle of the road for many misfortunes, including Cash s carpenter hopes, which lead to Cash falling off a roof and being unable to work for six months. He thinks the road has contributed to Addie s sickness. Vardaman returns, covered with blood from having cleaned the fish. Anse tells him to go wash up. Anse is weary.

    Darl narrates. He asks Jewel , repeatedly, if he realizes that Addie is going to die. He has bothered Dewey Dell, not out of malice but out of a strange detachment from how his words hurt her: he knew that Dewey Dell is pregnant, and that she is waiting for Addie to die so she can rush to town and find a pharmacist to help her have an abortion.

    This is perhaps one of Shakespeare''''''''s more interesting plays, if you will. In comparison to Macbeth it isn''''''''t quite the walk in the park.
    I think conceptually it enables the reader to see that characters can influence characters to such a degree that the original traits are masked and changed. Tragedy in this play is definitely a main component - and a great emphasis that perhaps the villain doesn''''''''t always find their true defeat. In a way, wasn''''''''t the "villain" successful? He lied to everyone and pretty much killed whomever got in his way.

    Before I begin expounding on this thought, let me first say that I am not a Shakespearean “Scholar”. I am just a teacher who loves teaching Shakespeare on the off-chance that one of my students will get bitten by the bug and want to study and read more of the man than just the set works that he or she has to cover for exam purposes.
    Having taught Othello to matric classes for the past 4 years, I have developed a few theories of my own about Shakespeare’s “bit” actors,. Read more

    Lady Macbeth, the strong-willed, persuasive, and charming wife of Macbeth. Ambitious for her husband’s glory, she finds herself unable to kill King Duncan in his sleep because he resembles her father. As Macbeth becomes more inhuman, she becomes remorseful and breaks under the strain. In her sleepwalking, she relives the events of the night of the king’s murder and tries to wash her hands clean of imaginary bloodstains.

    Banquo ( BAN -kwoh), Macbeth’s fellow commander. A man of noble character, seemingly unmoved by the prophecy of the Three Weird Sisters that he will beget kings, he is not completely innocent. He does not disclose his suspicions of Macbeth, and he accepts a place in Macbeth’s court. After being murdered by Macbeth’s assassins, Banquo appears at a ceremonial banquet. His blood-spattered ghost, visible only to Macbeth, unnerves the king completely. In the final vision shown to Macbeth by the Three Weird Sisters, Banquo and his line of kings appear.

  8. author
    @nemubot @mirinbot 18 Jan 2017 00:28

    I did an essay in my Uni years about the idea of moral dignity being parodied. For example, there is a great deal of literature celebrating the Southern idealism of morality and heroism, and As I Lay Dying is subtly criticising these moral obligations. Search for Elizabeth M. Kerr s essay As I Lay Dying: An ironic quest for some ideas.

  9. author
    greenleopard598 18 Jan 2017 05:47

  10. author
    silvercat572 18 Jan 2017 06:25

    The analysis for sections 46-52 states that "Darl’s burning of the barn does hasten reconciliation between Darl and Jewel." This couldn''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t be more untrue. As Jewel retrieves the casket from the fire, he lets out a blood curdling scream of "Darl!" already aware that it was he who set fire to the barn. After this, Jewel sits on the wagon and is said to glare at Darl like a bulldog waiting to pounce, and Jewel suggests to Anse that they should immediately tie Darl up to be taken to the asylum, even before their mother is buried. There neve

    One of the fifteen narrators. The youngest son of the family, and the second most frequently used narrator of the novel. Vardaman seems to teeter on the brink of mental collapse early on. His mother s death is extremely traumatizing, and his sensitive and imaginative nature is thrown out of balance by the event. He is at an age where he is becoming conscious of his status as a country boy (as opposed to a town boy), and he wonders why it should be so. He has a special bond with Darl.

    One of the fifteen narrators. Mother of the family. Gravely ill at the start of the novel, she dies early on. She has always wanted to be buried among her birth family in Jefferson. Once a schoolteacher, she married Anse and gave birth to four children by him: Cash, Darl, Dewey Dell, and Vardaman. She also had a secret affair with Whitfield, resulting in the birth of Jewel. The transport of her body is the main event of the novel.

    Anse narrates. Anse speaks of the misfortune of living near the road. He blames the bustle of the road for many misfortunes, including Cash s carpenter hopes, which lead to Cash falling off a roof and being unable to work for six months. He thinks the road has contributed to Addie s sickness. Vardaman returns, covered with blood from having cleaned the fish. Anse tells him to go wash up. Anse is weary.

    Darl narrates. He asks Jewel , repeatedly, if he realizes that Addie is going to die. He has bothered Dewey Dell, not out of malice but out of a strange detachment from how his words hurt her: he knew that Dewey Dell is pregnant, and that she is waiting for Addie to die so she can rush to town and find a pharmacist to help her have an abortion.

    This is perhaps one of Shakespeare's more interesting plays, if you will. In comparison to Macbeth it isn't quite the walk in the park.
    I think conceptually it enables the reader to see that characters can influence characters to such a degree that the original traits are masked and changed. Tragedy in this play is definitely a main component - and a great emphasis that perhaps the villain doesn't always find their true defeat. In a way, wasn't the "villain" successful? He lied to everyone and pretty much killed whomever got in his way.

    Before I begin expounding on this thought, let me first say that I am not a Shakespearean “Scholar”. I am just a teacher who loves teaching Shakespeare on the off-chance that one of my students will get bitten by the bug and want to study and read more of the man than just the set works that he or she has to cover for exam purposes.
    Having taught Othello to matric classes for the past 4 years, I have developed a few theories of my own about Shakespeare’s “bit” actors,. Read more

  11. author
    organicswan700 18 Jan 2017 01:09

    Cash loved his tools and his craft more than his mother, even as she layed in bed dying listening to him make her coffin. Even at the advice of his father, he would not move out of ear shot. The poignant message is on the journey when the bridge collapsed and his tools sunk to the bottom, and there was an all out recovery for all of Cash s tools. As Cash layed semi conscious, he always asked if all of his tools were recovered, not grieving for his mother, nor concerned about his damaged leg. These characters simply accepted death as part of life.

  12. author
    просто РУССКИЙ 18 Jan 2017 03:52

    The analysis for sections 46-52 states that "Darl’s burning of the barn does hasten reconciliation between Darl and Jewel." This couldn''''''''t be more untrue. As Jewel retrieves the casket from the fire, he lets out a blood curdling scream of "Darl!" already aware that it was he who set fire to the barn. After this, Jewel sits on the wagon and is said to glare at Darl like a bulldog waiting to pounce, and Jewel suggests to Anse that they should immediately tie Darl up to be taken to the asylum, even before their mother is buried. There neve

    One of the fifteen narrators. The youngest son of the family, and the second most frequently used narrator of the novel. Vardaman seems to teeter on the brink of mental collapse early on. His mother s death is extremely traumatizing, and his sensitive and imaginative nature is thrown out of balance by the event. He is at an age where he is becoming conscious of his status as a country boy (as opposed to a town boy), and he wonders why it should be so. He has a special bond with Darl.

    One of the fifteen narrators. Mother of the family. Gravely ill at the start of the novel, she dies early on. She has always wanted to be buried among her birth family in Jefferson. Once a schoolteacher, she married Anse and gave birth to four children by him: Cash, Darl, Dewey Dell, and Vardaman. She also had a secret affair with Whitfield, resulting in the birth of Jewel. The transport of her body is the main event of the novel.

    Anse narrates. Anse speaks of the misfortune of living near the road. He blames the bustle of the road for many misfortunes, including Cash s carpenter hopes, which lead to Cash falling off a roof and being unable to work for six months. He thinks the road has contributed to Addie s sickness. Vardaman returns, covered with blood from having cleaned the fish. Anse tells him to go wash up. Anse is weary.

    Darl narrates. He asks Jewel , repeatedly, if he realizes that Addie is going to die. He has bothered Dewey Dell, not out of malice but out of a strange detachment from how his words hurt her: he knew that Dewey Dell is pregnant, and that she is waiting for Addie to die so she can rush to town and find a pharmacist to help her have an abortion.

  13. author
    м.αĺмuтιѓι 18 Jan 2017 05:18

    Rosencrantz and Guildenstern seem incapable of functioning independently, so they're basically one character, no matter what they might say. They show up in Denmark.