17

What is the theme of carpe diem?

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: heavykoala176 | Category: Cover letter for a recreation programmer

Seize the day (formal) to use an opportunity to do something that you want and not to worry about the future Seize the day, young man. You may never get the chance to.

Comments
  1. author
    bluewolf249 18 Jan 2017 01:16

    Quintus Horatius Flaccus (Horace) and his reflections upon the world around him have - perhaps surprisingly - stayed in tune with human experience through many centuries. His lyrical, satirical, and sometimes mildly perplexing verse continues to inspire creative poets like Maureen Almond, who appeared in conversation with Stephen Harrison on BBC Radio 3's series The Essay: Greek and Roman Voices.

    "Live for the moment!" is one way of translating the compact little command carpe diem that forms part of the final flourish in Horace's Ode to Leuconoe (the eleventh poem in Book One.) We don't know anything about the girl in question or whether this poem urging her literally to seize the day is a nifty strategy for seduction ("Gather ye rosebuds while ye may" springs to mind here): "Don't ask the astrologers how many years you have left – but this might be the last winter you will see!"

  2. author
    purpledog610 18 Jan 2017 00:23

    Quintus Horatius Flaccus (Horace) and his reflections upon the world around him have - perhaps surprisingly - stayed in tune with human experience through many centuries. His lyrical, satirical, and sometimes mildly perplexing verse continues to inspire creative poets like Maureen Almond, who appeared in conversation with Stephen Harrison on BBC Radio 3''''s series The Essay: Greek and Roman Voices.

    "Live for the moment!" is one way of translating the compact little command carpe diem that forms part of the final flourish in Horace''''s Ode to Leuconoe (the eleventh poem in Book One.) We don''''t know anything about the girl in question or whether this poem urging her literally to seize the day is a nifty strategy for seduction ("Gather ye rosebuds while ye may" springs to mind here): "Don''''t ask the astrologers how many years you have left – but this might be the last winter you will see!"

    An older woman stops us, puts her hand over her heart and says something like, “ Oh Enjoy every moment. This time goes by so fast.”

    Everywhere I go, someone is telling me to seize the moment, raise my awareness, be happy, enjoy every second , etc, etc, etc.

    The Latin poet Horace’s advice of carpe diem — to seize the day and not worry about tomorrow — should be Trump’s transitional guide.

    Of the personal sort, expect more “investigative” reporting and “speaking truth to power” op-eds about his tax returns, his supposed theft of the election, his purported instigation of turbulence and mayhem, his locker-room talks about women, his business conflicts of interests in office, Trump University, and so on — perhaps written from the high moral ground by the WikiLeaks journalists of the Mark Leibovich, Dana Milbank, Glenn Thrush, Wolf Blitzer, or Donna Brazile sort.

  3. author
     👑лошадь Аркадий 🚬 18 Jan 2017 03:41

  4. author
    beautifulleopard368 18 Jan 2017 04:15

    Order paper here carpe diem seize the day essay

    Seize the day (formal) to use an opportunity to do something that you want and not to worry about the future Seize the day, young man. You may never get the chance to.

  5. author
    organicsnake700 18 Jan 2017 04:26

    Quintus Horatius Flaccus (Horace) and his reflections upon the world around him have - perhaps surprisingly - stayed in tune with human experience through many centuries. His lyrical, satirical, and sometimes mildly perplexing verse continues to inspire creative poets like Maureen Almond, who appeared in conversation with Stephen Harrison on BBC Radio 3''''''''''''''''s series The Essay: Greek and Roman Voices.

    "Live for the moment!" is one way of translating the compact little command carpe diem that forms part of the final flourish in Horace''''''''''''''''s Ode to Leuconoe (the eleventh poem in Book One.) We don''''''''''''''''t know anything about the girl in question or whether this poem urging her literally to seize the day is a nifty strategy for seduction ("Gather ye rosebuds while ye may" springs to mind here): "Don''''''''''''''''t ask the astrologers how many years you have left – but this might be the last winter you will see!"

    An older woman stops us, puts her hand over her heart and says something like, “ Oh Enjoy every moment. This time goes by so fast.”

    Everywhere I go, someone is telling me to seize the moment, raise my awareness, be happy, enjoy every second , etc, etc, etc.

    The Latin poet Horace’s advice of carpe diem — to seize the day and not worry about tomorrow — should be Trump’s transitional guide.

    Of the personal sort, expect more “investigative” reporting and “speaking truth to power” op-eds about his tax returns, his supposed theft of the election, his purported instigation of turbulence and mayhem, his locker-room talks about women, his business conflicts of interests in office, Trump University, and so on — perhaps written from the high moral ground by the WikiLeaks journalists of the Mark Leibovich, Dana Milbank, Glenn Thrush, Wolf Blitzer, or Donna Brazile sort.

    Via this password-protected portal parents may gain access to details regarding their sons and view account and contact details. Please update your contact details if applicable.

    The Parents’ Society promotes the welfare of the College by fostering a partnership between the College and the school community. Various events are organised throughout the year to promote networking and strong relationships between parents and the College.

  6. author
    beautifulrabbit900 18 Jan 2017 00:59

    Quintus Horatius Flaccus (Horace) and his reflections upon the world around him have - perhaps surprisingly - stayed in tune with human experience through many centuries. His lyrical, satirical, and sometimes mildly perplexing verse continues to inspire creative poets like Maureen Almond, who appeared in conversation with Stephen Harrison on BBC Radio 3''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s series The Essay: Greek and Roman Voices.

    "Live for the moment!" is one way of translating the compact little command carpe diem that forms part of the final flourish in Horace''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s Ode to Leuconoe (the eleventh poem in Book One.) We don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t know anything about the girl in question or whether this poem urging her literally to seize the day is a nifty strategy for seduction ("Gather ye rosebuds while ye may" springs to mind here): "Don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t ask the astrologers how many years you have left – but this might be the last winter you will see!"

    An older woman stops us, puts her hand over her heart and says something like, “ Oh Enjoy every moment. This time goes by so fast.”

    Everywhere I go, someone is telling me to seize the moment, raise my awareness, be happy, enjoy every second , etc, etc, etc.

    The Latin poet Horace’s advice of carpe diem — to seize the day and not worry about tomorrow — should be Trump’s transitional guide.

    Of the personal sort, expect more “investigative” reporting and “speaking truth to power” op-eds about his tax returns, his supposed theft of the election, his purported instigation of turbulence and mayhem, his locker-room talks about women, his business conflicts of interests in office, Trump University, and so on — perhaps written from the high moral ground by the WikiLeaks journalists of the Mark Leibovich, Dana Milbank, Glenn Thrush, Wolf Blitzer, or Donna Brazile sort.

    Via this password-protected portal parents may gain access to details regarding their sons and view account and contact details. Please update your contact details if applicable.

    The Parents’ Society promotes the welfare of the College by fostering a partnership between the College and the school community. Various events are organised throughout the year to promote networking and strong relationships between parents and the College.

    What do you think about Mr Keating's teaching methods? Is it a good way to teach the boys, considering their age and apparent immaturiy?

    Mr Keating's teaching methods are very unusual and goes against the convntional values at that time. It encourages student to think for themselves. His methods are also risky, as it is rather experimental and untested when he applies this to the boys. However, only time can tell if it is a suitable way to teach the boys. Sadly Keating was expelled so soon.

  7. author
    Максим Белов 18 Jan 2017 02:59

    Stop making excuses ["not enough time" "I can t do my own work" etc.] and read the book. The easiest way to summarize is to write down just words or phrases that capture the feeling or events in the chapter. If you were writing an essay, then you d need to organize them into points and a coherent structure. You have it easier in that you just need to translate these words and phrases into lines of poetry. Remember that poetry does NOT have to rhyme (unless you were directed to rhyme) but usually does have meter to it - a similar pattern to the emphases in each line. Think of it as a rap, which is all about rhythm, if this makes it easier. In fact, most people consider lyrics to be poetry. And you can rap, can t you? Hope this helps!

  8. author
    ᅠᅠᅠᅠᅠᅠлёша dюs 18 Jan 2017 07:59

    Quintus Horatius Flaccus (Horace) and his reflections upon the world around him have - perhaps surprisingly - stayed in tune with human experience through many centuries. His lyrical, satirical, and sometimes mildly perplexing verse continues to inspire creative poets like Maureen Almond, who appeared in conversation with Stephen Harrison on BBC Radio 3''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s series The Essay: Greek and Roman Voices.

    "Live for the moment!" is one way of translating the compact little command carpe diem that forms part of the final flourish in Horace''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s Ode to Leuconoe (the eleventh poem in Book One.) We don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t know anything about the girl in question or whether this poem urging her literally to seize the day is a nifty strategy for seduction ("Gather ye rosebuds while ye may" springs to mind here): "Don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t ask the astrologers how many years you have left – but this might be the last winter you will see!"

    An older woman stops us, puts her hand over her heart and says something like, “ Oh Enjoy every moment. This time goes by so fast.”

    Everywhere I go, someone is telling me to seize the moment, raise my awareness, be happy, enjoy every second , etc, etc, etc.

    The Latin poet Horace’s advice of carpe diem — to seize the day and not worry about tomorrow — should be Trump’s transitional guide.

    Of the personal sort, expect more “investigative” reporting and “speaking truth to power” op-eds about his tax returns, his supposed theft of the election, his purported instigation of turbulence and mayhem, his locker-room talks about women, his business conflicts of interests in office, Trump University, and so on — perhaps written from the high moral ground by the WikiLeaks journalists of the Mark Leibovich, Dana Milbank, Glenn Thrush, Wolf Blitzer, or Donna Brazile sort.

    Via this password-protected portal parents may gain access to details regarding their sons and view account and contact details. Please update your contact details if applicable.

    The Parents’ Society promotes the welfare of the College by fostering a partnership between the College and the school community. Various events are organised throughout the year to promote networking and strong relationships between parents and the College.

    What do you think about Mr Keating''''''''''''''''s teaching methods? Is it a good way to teach the boys, considering their age and apparent immaturiy?

    Mr Keating''''''''''''''''s teaching methods are very unusual and goes against the convntional values at that time. It encourages student to think for themselves. His methods are also risky, as it is rather experimental and untested when he applies this to the boys. However, only time can tell if it is a suitable way to teach the boys. Sadly Keating was expelled so soon.

    The idiom, “ Make hay while the sun shines ” originated in an agricultural setting and originally it was in the form “when the sun shineth, make hay”.

    This unique expression refers to the production of hay after a harvest. The warmth of the sun’s rays dry up the wheat stalks and turns them into hay.

    Guess what? You already know this poem. Seriously. Ever heard the line " Gather ye rosebuds while ye may "? Nope, it''''s not Shakespeare; it''''s the first line of Robert Herrick ''''s "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time."

    Herrick was probably inspired to write "To the Virgins" by a line from a Latin poet named Ausonius (c. 310–395), who penned the following line: "Collige, virgo, rosas, dum flos novus et nova pubes, / et memor esto aevum sic properare tuum." Hmm. In English? OK, here we go: "Maidens, gather roses, while blooms are fresh and youth is fresh, and be mindful that your life-time hastes away." Sounds familiar, right? Well, people weren''''t as picky about plagiarism back in 17th century as they are today.

    Even though Latin is considered a dead language (no country officially speaks it), its influence upon other languages makes it still important. Latin words and expressions are present in virtually all the languages around the world, as well as on different scientific and academic fields.

    alibi: elsewhere
    alter: another
    bellum: war
    bonus: good
    borealis: northern
    corpus: body
    derma: skin
    dies: day
    domus: home/house
    ego: I/me
    erectus: upright
    gens: family
    homo: human
    malus: bad
    magnus: great
    nemo: nobody
    omnis: everything
    pax: peace
    primus: first
    qui: who
    rex: king
    sapiens: wise
    terra: earth
    tempus: time
    virtus: virtue
    vivo: live
    vox: voice

  9. author
    redfish871 18 Jan 2017 02:52

    Quintus Horatius Flaccus (Horace) and his reflections upon the world around him have - perhaps surprisingly - stayed in tune with human experience through many centuries. His lyrical, satirical, and sometimes mildly perplexing verse continues to inspire creative poets like Maureen Almond, who appeared in conversation with Stephen Harrison on BBC Radio 3''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s series The Essay: Greek and Roman Voices.

    "Live for the moment!" is one way of translating the compact little command carpe diem that forms part of the final flourish in Horace''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s Ode to Leuconoe (the eleventh poem in Book One.) We don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t know anything about the girl in question or whether this poem urging her literally to seize the day is a nifty strategy for seduction ("Gather ye rosebuds while ye may" springs to mind here): "Don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t ask the astrologers how many years you have left – but this might be the last winter you will see!"

    An older woman stops us, puts her hand over her heart and says something like, “ Oh Enjoy every moment. This time goes by so fast.”

    Everywhere I go, someone is telling me to seize the moment, raise my awareness, be happy, enjoy every second , etc, etc, etc.

    The Latin poet Horace’s advice of carpe diem — to seize the day and not worry about tomorrow — should be Trump’s transitional guide.

    Of the personal sort, expect more “investigative” reporting and “speaking truth to power” op-eds about his tax returns, his supposed theft of the election, his purported instigation of turbulence and mayhem, his locker-room talks about women, his business conflicts of interests in office, Trump University, and so on — perhaps written from the high moral ground by the WikiLeaks journalists of the Mark Leibovich, Dana Milbank, Glenn Thrush, Wolf Blitzer, or Donna Brazile sort.

    Via this password-protected portal parents may gain access to details regarding their sons and view account and contact details. Please update your contact details if applicable.

    The Parents’ Society promotes the welfare of the College by fostering a partnership between the College and the school community. Various events are organised throughout the year to promote networking and strong relationships between parents and the College.

    What do you think about Mr Keating''''''''s teaching methods? Is it a good way to teach the boys, considering their age and apparent immaturiy?

    Mr Keating''''''''s teaching methods are very unusual and goes against the convntional values at that time. It encourages student to think for themselves. His methods are also risky, as it is rather experimental and untested when he applies this to the boys. However, only time can tell if it is a suitable way to teach the boys. Sadly Keating was expelled so soon.

    The idiom, “ Make hay while the sun shines ” originated in an agricultural setting and originally it was in the form “when the sun shineth, make hay”.

    This unique expression refers to the production of hay after a harvest. The warmth of the sun’s rays dry up the wheat stalks and turns them into hay.

    Guess what? You already know this poem. Seriously. Ever heard the line " Gather ye rosebuds while ye may "? Nope, it''s not Shakespeare; it''s the first line of Robert Herrick ''s "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time."

    Herrick was probably inspired to write "To the Virgins" by a line from a Latin poet named Ausonius (c. 310–395), who penned the following line: "Collige, virgo, rosas, dum flos novus et nova pubes, / et memor esto aevum sic properare tuum." Hmm. In English? OK, here we go: "Maidens, gather roses, while blooms are fresh and youth is fresh, and be mindful that your life-time hastes away." Sounds familiar, right? Well, people weren''t as picky about plagiarism back in 17th century as they are today.

  10. author
    Христина Ткаченко 18 Jan 2017 02:17

    The Birth of Comedy. Take the topical satire of Have I Got News For You and mix thoroughly with the adolescent humour of The Inbetweeners, add in a healthy dose of.

  11. author
    brownmeercat915 17 Jan 2017 22:01

    Quintus Horatius Flaccus (Horace) and his reflections upon the world around him have - perhaps surprisingly - stayed in tune with human experience through many centuries. His lyrical, satirical, and sometimes mildly perplexing verse continues to inspire creative poets like Maureen Almond, who appeared in conversation with Stephen Harrison on BBC Radio 3''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s series The Essay: Greek and Roman Voices.

    "Live for the moment!" is one way of translating the compact little command carpe diem that forms part of the final flourish in Horace''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s Ode to Leuconoe (the eleventh poem in Book One.) We don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t know anything about the girl in question or whether this poem urging her literally to seize the day is a nifty strategy for seduction ("Gather ye rosebuds while ye may" springs to mind here): "Don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t ask the astrologers how many years you have left – but this might be the last winter you will see!"

    An older woman stops us, puts her hand over her heart and says something like, “ Oh Enjoy every moment. This time goes by so fast.”

    Everywhere I go, someone is telling me to seize the moment, raise my awareness, be happy, enjoy every second , etc, etc, etc.

    The Latin poet Horace’s advice of carpe diem — to seize the day and not worry about tomorrow — should be Trump’s transitional guide.

    Of the personal sort, expect more “investigative” reporting and “speaking truth to power” op-eds about his tax returns, his supposed theft of the election, his purported instigation of turbulence and mayhem, his locker-room talks about women, his business conflicts of interests in office, Trump University, and so on — perhaps written from the high moral ground by the WikiLeaks journalists of the Mark Leibovich, Dana Milbank, Glenn Thrush, Wolf Blitzer, or Donna Brazile sort.

    Via this password-protected portal parents may gain access to details regarding their sons and view account and contact details. Please update your contact details if applicable.

    The Parents’ Society promotes the welfare of the College by fostering a partnership between the College and the school community. Various events are organised throughout the year to promote networking and strong relationships between parents and the College.

    What do you think about Mr Keating''s teaching methods? Is it a good way to teach the boys, considering their age and apparent immaturiy?

    Mr Keating''s teaching methods are very unusual and goes against the convntional values at that time. It encourages student to think for themselves. His methods are also risky, as it is rather experimental and untested when he applies this to the boys. However, only time can tell if it is a suitable way to teach the boys. Sadly Keating was expelled so soon.

    The idiom, “ Make hay while the sun shines ” originated in an agricultural setting and originally it was in the form “when the sun shineth, make hay”.

    This unique expression refers to the production of hay after a harvest. The warmth of the sun’s rays dry up the wheat stalks and turns them into hay.

  12. author
    Володин Алексей 17 Jan 2017 22:54

    From Shmoop Poetry Marvell belongs to a group commonly known as the "Metaphysical Poets." The group includes some other poets we love: George Herbert, John Donne, and Richard Crashaw – all from the 1500s and 1600s. Their poems are famous for the surprising (and, at times, shocking and daring) use of language to explore BIG questions about love, sex, the earth, the universe, and the divine. Time holds a huge fascination for poets in Marvell’s era, and the phrase carpe diem (seize the day) has a special significance. "Life is short, so live it to the fullest," is one way to describe the carpe diem mindset.

  13. author
    orangepeacock573 17 Jan 2017 23:35

    Quintus Horatius Flaccus (Horace) and his reflections upon the world around him have - perhaps surprisingly - stayed in tune with human experience through many centuries. His lyrical, satirical, and sometimes mildly perplexing verse continues to inspire creative poets like Maureen Almond, who appeared in conversation with Stephen Harrison on BBC Radio 3''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s series The Essay: Greek and Roman Voices.

    "Live for the moment!" is one way of translating the compact little command carpe diem that forms part of the final flourish in Horace''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s Ode to Leuconoe (the eleventh poem in Book One.) We don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t know anything about the girl in question or whether this poem urging her literally to seize the day is a nifty strategy for seduction ("Gather ye rosebuds while ye may" springs to mind here): "Don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t ask the astrologers how many years you have left – but this might be the last winter you will see!"

    An older woman stops us, puts her hand over her heart and says something like, “ Oh Enjoy every moment. This time goes by so fast.”

    Everywhere I go, someone is telling me to seize the moment, raise my awareness, be happy, enjoy every second , etc, etc, etc.

    The Latin poet Horace’s advice of carpe diem — to seize the day and not worry about tomorrow — should be Trump’s transitional guide.

    Of the personal sort, expect more “investigative” reporting and “speaking truth to power” op-eds about his tax returns, his supposed theft of the election, his purported instigation of turbulence and mayhem, his locker-room talks about women, his business conflicts of interests in office, Trump University, and so on — perhaps written from the high moral ground by the WikiLeaks journalists of the Mark Leibovich, Dana Milbank, Glenn Thrush, Wolf Blitzer, or Donna Brazile sort.

    Via this password-protected portal parents may gain access to details regarding their sons and view account and contact details. Please update your contact details if applicable.

    The Parents’ Society promotes the welfare of the College by fostering a partnership between the College and the school community. Various events are organised throughout the year to promote networking and strong relationships between parents and the College.

    What do you think about Mr Keating''''s teaching methods? Is it a good way to teach the boys, considering their age and apparent immaturiy?

    Mr Keating''''s teaching methods are very unusual and goes against the convntional values at that time. It encourages student to think for themselves. His methods are also risky, as it is rather experimental and untested when he applies this to the boys. However, only time can tell if it is a suitable way to teach the boys. Sadly Keating was expelled so soon.

    The idiom, “ Make hay while the sun shines ” originated in an agricultural setting and originally it was in the form “when the sun shineth, make hay”.

    This unique expression refers to the production of hay after a harvest. The warmth of the sun’s rays dry up the wheat stalks and turns them into hay.

    Guess what? You already know this poem. Seriously. Ever heard the line " Gather ye rosebuds while ye may "? Nope, it's not Shakespeare; it's the first line of Robert Herrick 's "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time."

    Herrick was probably inspired to write "To the Virgins" by a line from a Latin poet named Ausonius (c. 310–395), who penned the following line: "Collige, virgo, rosas, dum flos novus et nova pubes, / et memor esto aevum sic properare tuum." Hmm. In English? OK, here we go: "Maidens, gather roses, while blooms are fresh and youth is fresh, and be mindful that your life-time hastes away." Sounds familiar, right? Well, people weren't as picky about plagiarism back in 17th century as they are today.

  14. author
    heavytiger794 18 Jan 2017 04:54

    Quintus Horatius Flaccus (Horace) and his reflections upon the world around him have - perhaps surprisingly - stayed in tune with human experience through many centuries. His lyrical, satirical, and sometimes mildly perplexing verse continues to inspire creative poets like Maureen Almond, who appeared in conversation with Stephen Harrison on BBC Radio 3''''''''s series The Essay: Greek and Roman Voices.

    "Live for the moment!" is one way of translating the compact little command carpe diem that forms part of the final flourish in Horace''''''''s Ode to Leuconoe (the eleventh poem in Book One.) We don''''''''t know anything about the girl in question or whether this poem urging her literally to seize the day is a nifty strategy for seduction ("Gather ye rosebuds while ye may" springs to mind here): "Don''''''''t ask the astrologers how many years you have left – but this might be the last winter you will see!"

    An older woman stops us, puts her hand over her heart and says something like, “ Oh Enjoy every moment. This time goes by so fast.”

    Everywhere I go, someone is telling me to seize the moment, raise my awareness, be happy, enjoy every second , etc, etc, etc.

    The Latin poet Horace’s advice of carpe diem — to seize the day and not worry about tomorrow — should be Trump’s transitional guide.

    Of the personal sort, expect more “investigative” reporting and “speaking truth to power” op-eds about his tax returns, his supposed theft of the election, his purported instigation of turbulence and mayhem, his locker-room talks about women, his business conflicts of interests in office, Trump University, and so on — perhaps written from the high moral ground by the WikiLeaks journalists of the Mark Leibovich, Dana Milbank, Glenn Thrush, Wolf Blitzer, or Donna Brazile sort.

  15. author
    FU i'm drunk 17 Jan 2017 23:37

    Quintus Horatius Flaccus (Horace) and his reflections upon the world around him have - perhaps surprisingly - stayed in tune with human experience through many centuries. His lyrical, satirical, and sometimes mildly perplexing verse continues to inspire creative poets like Maureen Almond, who appeared in conversation with Stephen Harrison on BBC Radio 3''s series The Essay: Greek and Roman Voices.

    "Live for the moment!" is one way of translating the compact little command carpe diem that forms part of the final flourish in Horace''s Ode to Leuconoe (the eleventh poem in Book One.) We don''t know anything about the girl in question or whether this poem urging her literally to seize the day is a nifty strategy for seduction ("Gather ye rosebuds while ye may" springs to mind here): "Don''t ask the astrologers how many years you have left – but this might be the last winter you will see!"

    An older woman stops us, puts her hand over her heart and says something like, “ Oh Enjoy every moment. This time goes by so fast.”

    Everywhere I go, someone is telling me to seize the moment, raise my awareness, be happy, enjoy every second , etc, etc, etc.

  16. author
    purplebutterfly282 18 Jan 2017 01:18

    By explaining what it means. That s usually a good starting point for a Latin (or other language) quote because many people won t know what it means and so your essay is going to be lost on them. The phrase originated in a poem by Homer - the blind poet. And you may be able to use that in your introduction