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18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: User1491415323 | Category: Church turing thesis artificial intelligence

Many societies worldwide claim to be meritocracies – that is, that their societies exclusively distribute resources on the basis of merit. The term "meritocracy" was coined by Michael Young in his 1958 dystopian essay " The Rise of the Meritocracy " to demonstrate the social dysfunctions that he anticipated arising in societies where the elites believe that they are successful entirely on the basis of merit, so the adoption of this term into English sans negative connotations is ironic; [2] Young was concerned that the Tripartite System of education being practiced in the United Kingdom at the time he wrote the essay considered merit to be "intelligence-plus-effort, its possessors. identified at an early age and selected for appropriate intensive education” and that the "obsession with quantification, test-scoring, and qualifications” it supported would create an educated middle-class elite at the expense of the education of the working class, inevitably resulting in injustice and – eventually – revolution. [3] A modern representation of the sort of “meritocracy” Young feared may be seen in the series 3%.

Although merit matters to some degree in many societies, research shows that the distribution of resources in societies often follows hierarchical social categorizations of persons to a degree too significant to warrant calling these societies “meritocratic”, since even exceptional intelligence, talent, or other forms of merit may not be compensatory for the social disadvantages people face. In many cases, social inequality is linked to racial inequality , ethnic inequality , and gender inequality , as well as other social statuses and these forms can be related to corruption. [4]

Comments
  1. author
    ticklishdog954 18 Jan 2017 01:11

    Go to Google and click on the advanced settings and type in the date you want to find articles after. Then do some preliminary searches with various combinations of keywords to find what you re really looking for. Recession +Crime +affects When it comes to research, you have to sift through the vast amount of data to find what you want. This isn t an easy task, and it won t take 10 minutes. Also, articles about specific events will help you get an indication of whether things would happen in the future. Because, really who knows if a recession is likely to cause more crime unless it has already done that in the past???

  2. author
    heavyleopard100 18 Jan 2017 03:52

    As far as finding articles on the issue I don t think I can help you; however if you re doing this for a university paper you might want to check sources that your school has access to like JSTOR. I ve used that website for all kinds of different subjects (social sciences and English particularly) and it has always found some of the best articles and journals I ve used for papers.

  3. author
    purpleduck564 18 Jan 2017 04:51

    The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences is a peer-reviewed, open-access journal of original empirical research articles by both established and emerging scholars.

    P aul Krugman and other like-minded gentlemen keep trying to make a case for more aggressive redistribution of income, but they keep making the case for education reform.

    As Professor Cochrane points out, the New York Times ’ Neil Irwin repeats the same argument: that poor educational performance is a drag on the economy. “But that’s not inequality lowering growth,” he writes, “that’s bad education causing both more inequality and lower growth.” Professor Krugman, hypnotized by the exercise of his own debilitating self-righteousness, never even considers whether educational reform should be part of his agenda, concluding with goofy histrionics: “Being nice to the wealthy and cruel to the poor is not, it turns out, the key to economic growth.”

    The distribution of education both in terms of quality and quantity is highly uneven in most societies. Inequality in opportunities for education is found not only with reference to individuals and social classes but also in terms of regions and territorial regions such as urban and rural areas.

    Our educational system is urban biased in the matter of location of facilities; allocation of finance etc is a well-established fact. Most institutions of higher learning and good schools are concentrated in urban areas. The awareness of their existence and utility is also greater there. The students from the urban areas are favored for admission than those from the rural areas.

    Today, President Obama will sign a bill to cut $8.7 billion from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), also known as food stamps, slashing almost $100 per month in benefits for nearly a million households.

    The attack on food stamps comes as Obama and the Democrats posture in the run-up to this year’s mid-term elections as opponents of social inequality and defenders of the poor and jobless. Nowhere in the establishment media is the glaring contradiction between what the Democrats say and what they do even discussed.

    A new book by the veteran Brandeis University scholar Thomas Shapiro explores how America’s wealth gap destroys social mobility, deepens the racial divide, and endangers our future.

    In response to enormous public pressure, lawmakers have rejected appeals by global corporations and voted to protect the country’s people and water supply by banning metallic mining.

  4. author
    bluebutterfly561 18 Jan 2017 03:57

    The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences is a peer-reviewed, open-access journal of original empirical research articles by both established and emerging scholars.

    P aul Krugman and other like-minded gentlemen keep trying to make a case for more aggressive redistribution of income, but they keep making the case for education reform.

    As Professor Cochrane points out, the New York Times ’ Neil Irwin repeats the same argument: that poor educational performance is a drag on the economy. “But that’s not inequality lowering growth,” he writes, “that’s bad education causing both more inequality and lower growth.” Professor Krugman, hypnotized by the exercise of his own debilitating self-righteousness, never even considers whether educational reform should be part of his agenda, concluding with goofy histrionics: “Being nice to the wealthy and cruel to the poor is not, it turns out, the key to economic growth.”

    The distribution of education both in terms of quality and quantity is highly uneven in most societies. Inequality in opportunities for education is found not only with reference to individuals and social classes but also in terms of regions and territorial regions such as urban and rural areas.

    Our educational system is urban biased in the matter of location of facilities; allocation of finance etc is a well-established fact. Most institutions of higher learning and good schools are concentrated in urban areas. The awareness of their existence and utility is also greater there. The students from the urban areas are favored for admission than those from the rural areas.

  5. author
    МинОбрНауки России Compte certifié 18 Jan 2017 04:43

    Try looking in most magazines at the store. They are full of social health articles, such as studies on smoking and teen health, how to be happy with someone etc. Did you have any specific definition by your teacher for social health"? If so, use that to determine if a particular article will work for your assignment. Good luck.

  6. author
    Ivan Sirenko 17 Jan 2017 22:45

    Order paper here articles on social inequality in education

    Many societies worldwide claim to be meritocracies – that is, that their societies exclusively distribute resources on the basis of merit. The term "meritocracy" was coined by Michael Young in his 1958 dystopian essay " The Rise of the Meritocracy " to demonstrate the social dysfunctions that he anticipated arising in societies where the elites believe that they are successful entirely on the basis of merit, so the adoption of this term into English sans negative connotations is ironic; [2] Young was concerned that the Tripartite System of education being practiced in the United Kingdom at the time he wrote the essay considered merit to be "intelligence-plus-effort, its possessors. identified at an early age and selected for appropriate intensive education” and that the "obsession with quantification, test-scoring, and qualifications” it supported would create an educated middle-class elite at the expense of the education of the working class, inevitably resulting in injustice and – eventually – revolution. [3] A modern representation of the sort of “meritocracy” Young feared may be seen in the series 3%.

    Although merit matters to some degree in many societies, research shows that the distribution of resources in societies often follows hierarchical social categorizations of persons to a degree too significant to warrant calling these societies “meritocratic”, since even exceptional intelligence, talent, or other forms of merit may not be compensatory for the social disadvantages people face. In many cases, social inequality is linked to racial inequality , ethnic inequality , and gender inequality , as well as other social statuses and these forms can be related to corruption. [4]

  7. author
    ticklishwolf867 18 Jan 2017 07:10

    The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences is a peer-reviewed, open-access journal of original empirical research articles by both established and emerging scholars.

  8. author
    User1490618012 18 Jan 2017 03:39

    The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences is a peer-reviewed, open-access journal of original empirical research articles by both established and emerging scholars.

    P aul Krugman and other like-minded gentlemen keep trying to make a case for more aggressive redistribution of income, but they keep making the case for education reform.

    As Professor Cochrane points out, the New York Times ’ Neil Irwin repeats the same argument: that poor educational performance is a drag on the economy. “But that’s not inequality lowering growth,” he writes, “that’s bad education causing both more inequality and lower growth.” Professor Krugman, hypnotized by the exercise of his own debilitating self-righteousness, never even considers whether educational reform should be part of his agenda, concluding with goofy histrionics: “Being nice to the wealthy and cruel to the poor is not, it turns out, the key to economic growth.”

  9. author
    ticklishgorilla135 18 Jan 2017 06:29

    New Dimensions of Social Inequality. This Postdoctoral Research Project was carried out by Dr. Charles Walker, now Lecturer in Sociology at the University of.

  10. author
    User1490250994 17 Jan 2017 23:52

    The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences is a peer-reviewed, open-access journal of original empirical research articles by both established and emerging scholars.

    P aul Krugman and other like-minded gentlemen keep trying to make a case for more aggressive redistribution of income, but they keep making the case for education reform.

    As Professor Cochrane points out, the New York Times ’ Neil Irwin repeats the same argument: that poor educational performance is a drag on the economy. “But that’s not inequality lowering growth,” he writes, “that’s bad education causing both more inequality and lower growth.” Professor Krugman, hypnotized by the exercise of his own debilitating self-righteousness, never even considers whether educational reform should be part of his agenda, concluding with goofy histrionics: “Being nice to the wealthy and cruel to the poor is not, it turns out, the key to economic growth.”

    The distribution of education both in terms of quality and quantity is highly uneven in most societies. Inequality in opportunities for education is found not only with reference to individuals and social classes but also in terms of regions and territorial regions such as urban and rural areas.

    Our educational system is urban biased in the matter of location of facilities; allocation of finance etc is a well-established fact. Most institutions of higher learning and good schools are concentrated in urban areas. The awareness of their existence and utility is also greater there. The students from the urban areas are favored for admission than those from the rural areas.

    Today, President Obama will sign a bill to cut $8.7 billion from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), also known as food stamps, slashing almost $100 per month in benefits for nearly a million households.

    The attack on food stamps comes as Obama and the Democrats posture in the run-up to this year’s mid-term elections as opponents of social inequality and defenders of the poor and jobless. Nowhere in the establishment media is the glaring contradiction between what the Democrats say and what they do even discussed.