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Writing a 500 word essay on a quote of Alexander Hamilton HELP!?

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: Анастас. | Category: Best technical resume template

Vicky Pattison hits back at criticism for ‘unflattering’ bikini photos Former Geordie Shore star was papped while on holiday in Mallorca

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  1. author
    MorgieBear 💞 18 Jan 2017 01:02

    you know that is called plagarism and any work you copy the examners will know because they will have read them all before

  2. author
    heavycat673 18 Jan 2017 01:08

    Synopsis. Alexander Pope was born on May 21, 1688 in London, England. He was ill as a child and was left only 4' 6" tall with curvature of the spine and was a.

  3. author
    orangepanda972 18 Jan 2017 04:42

    Alexander Pope (21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744) was an 18th-century English poet. He is best known for his satirical verse, as well as for his translation of Homer. Famous for his use of the heroic couplet , he is the second-most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations after Shakespeare. [1]

    At Binfield, he also began to make many important friends. One of them, John Caryll (the future dedicatee of The Rape of the Lock ), was twenty years older than the poet and had made many acquaintances in the London literary world. He introduced the young Pope to the ageing playwright William Wycherley and to William Walsh, a minor poet, who helped Pope revise his first major work, The Pastorals. He also met the Blount sisters, Teresa and Martha , both of whom would remain lifelong friends. [5]

    Pope''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "Essay on Criticism" is a didactic poem in heroic couplets, begun, perhaps, as early as 1705, and published, anonymously, in 1711. The poetic essay was a relatively new genre, and the "Essay" itself was Pope''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s most ambitious work to that time. It was in part an attempt on Pope''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s part to identify and refine his own positions as poet and critic, and his response to an ongoing critical debate which centered on the question of whether poetry should be "natural" or written according to predetermined "artificial" rules inherited from the classical past.

    Pope then proceeds to discuss the laws by which a critic should be guided insisting, as any good poet would, that critics exist to serve poets, not to attack them. He then provides, by way of example, instances of critics who had erred in one fashion or another. What, in Pope''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s opinion (here as elsewhere in his work) is the deadliest critical sin a sin which is itself a reflection of a greater sin? All of his erring critics, each in their own way, betray the same fatal flaw.

    Throughout the poem, Pope refers to ancient writers such as Virgil , Homer , Aristotle , Horace and Longinus. This is a testament to his belief that the "Imitation of the ancients" is the ultimate standard for taste. Pope also says, "True ease in writing comes from art, not chance, / As those move easiest who have learned to dance" (362–363), meaning poets are made, not born.

    As is usual in Pope''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s poems, the Essay concludes with a reference to Pope himself. Walsh, the last of the critics mentioned, was a mentor and friend of Pope who had died in 1710.

    The following entry presents criticism of Pope''''''''s poem The Rape of the Lock (written in two cantos in 1712, later expanded to five cantos in 1714, and slightly revised in 1717). See also, Alexander Pope Criticism and An Essay on Man Criticism.

    Memoirs of the Extraordinary Life, Works, and Discoveries of Martinus Scriblerus [With John Arbuthnot, John Gay, Thomas Parnell, and Jonathan Swift] (satire) 1737

    The Augustans'''' love for the classics is reflected in these lines. Here, Pope is waxing lyrical about what a wonderful writer the ancient poet Horace was.

    According to Pope, Horace is great at talking us "into Sense." He conveys to us "the truest Notions in the easiest way." Basically, if you ask Pope, Horace is so much better than all those hacks writing during Pope''''s own time, who " judge with Fury , but… write with Fle''''me. "


    This is one of the profoundest poems I have ever read or hope to read. (Report) Reply

  4. author
    bigbutterfly233 18 Jan 2017 05:54

    Click here an essay on criticism by alexander pope

    Vicky Pattison hits back at criticism for ‘unflattering’ bikini photos Former Geordie Shore star was papped while on holiday in Mallorca

  5. author
    Russian Imperialist 18 Jan 2017 01:03

    Alexander Pope (21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744) was an 18th-century English poet. He is best known for his satirical verse, as well as for his translation of Homer. Famous for his use of the heroic couplet , he is the second-most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations after Shakespeare. [1]

    At Binfield, he also began to make many important friends. One of them, John Caryll (the future dedicatee of The Rape of the Lock ), was twenty years older than the poet and had made many acquaintances in the London literary world. He introduced the young Pope to the ageing playwright William Wycherley and to William Walsh, a minor poet, who helped Pope revise his first major work, The Pastorals. He also met the Blount sisters, Teresa and Martha , both of whom would remain lifelong friends. [5]

    Pope''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "Essay on Criticism" is a didactic poem in heroic couplets, begun, perhaps, as early as 1705, and published, anonymously, in 1711. The poetic essay was a relatively new genre, and the "Essay" itself was Pope''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s most ambitious work to that time. It was in part an attempt on Pope''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s part to identify and refine his own positions as poet and critic, and his response to an ongoing critical debate which centered on the question of whether poetry should be "natural" or written according to predetermined "artificial" rules inherited from the classical past.

    Pope then proceeds to discuss the laws by which a critic should be guided insisting, as any good poet would, that critics exist to serve poets, not to attack them. He then provides, by way of example, instances of critics who had erred in one fashion or another. What, in Pope''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s opinion (here as elsewhere in his work) is the deadliest critical sin a sin which is itself a reflection of a greater sin? All of his erring critics, each in their own way, betray the same fatal flaw.

    Throughout the poem, Pope refers to ancient writers such as Virgil , Homer , Aristotle , Horace and Longinus. This is a testament to his belief that the "Imitation of the ancients" is the ultimate standard for taste. Pope also says, "True ease in writing comes from art, not chance, / As those move easiest who have learned to dance" (362–363), meaning poets are made, not born.

    As is usual in Pope''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s poems, the Essay concludes with a reference to Pope himself. Walsh, the last of the critics mentioned, was a mentor and friend of Pope who had died in 1710.

    The following entry presents criticism of Pope''''s poem The Rape of the Lock (written in two cantos in 1712, later expanded to five cantos in 1714, and slightly revised in 1717). See also, Alexander Pope Criticism and An Essay on Man Criticism.

    Memoirs of the Extraordinary Life, Works, and Discoveries of Martinus Scriblerus [With John Arbuthnot, John Gay, Thomas Parnell, and Jonathan Swift] (satire) 1737

    The Augustans'' love for the classics is reflected in these lines. Here, Pope is waxing lyrical about what a wonderful writer the ancient poet Horace was.

    According to Pope, Horace is great at talking us "into Sense." He conveys to us "the truest Notions in the easiest way." Basically, if you ask Pope, Horace is so much better than all those hacks writing during Pope''s own time, who " judge with Fury , but… write with Fle''me. "


    This is one of the profoundest poems I have ever read or hope to read. (Report) Reply

  6. author
    ticklishlion340 18 Jan 2017 06:09

  7. author
    Политобоз 18 Jan 2017 06:20

    go to youtr nearest Liberary we still have this free services you know?

  8. author
    Ꭾяเηcєѕѕ тιηу т ♡ 17 Jan 2017 22:50

    Alexander Pope (21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744) was an 18th-century English poet. He is best known for his satirical verse, as well as for his translation of Homer. Famous for his use of the heroic couplet , he is the second-most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations after Shakespeare. [1]

    At Binfield, he also began to make many important friends. One of them, John Caryll (the future dedicatee of The Rape of the Lock ), was twenty years older than the poet and had made many acquaintances in the London literary world. He introduced the young Pope to the ageing playwright William Wycherley and to William Walsh, a minor poet, who helped Pope revise his first major work, The Pastorals. He also met the Blount sisters, Teresa and Martha , both of whom would remain lifelong friends. [5]

    Pope's "Essay on Criticism" is a didactic poem in heroic couplets, begun, perhaps, as early as 1705, and published, anonymously, in 1711. The poetic essay was a relatively new genre, and the "Essay" itself was Pope's most ambitious work to that time. It was in part an attempt on Pope's part to identify and refine his own positions as poet and critic, and his response to an ongoing critical debate which centered on the question of whether poetry should be "natural" or written according to predetermined "artificial" rules inherited from the classical past.

    Pope then proceeds to discuss the laws by which a critic should be guided insisting, as any good poet would, that critics exist to serve poets, not to attack them. He then provides, by way of example, instances of critics who had erred in one fashion or another. What, in Pope's opinion (here as elsewhere in his work) is the deadliest critical sin a sin which is itself a reflection of a greater sin? All of his erring critics, each in their own way, betray the same fatal flaw.

  9. author
    bigmeercat526 18 Jan 2017 01:27

    Alexander Pope (21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744) was an 18th-century English poet. He is best known for his satirical verse, as well as for his translation of Homer. Famous for his use of the heroic couplet , he is the second-most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations after Shakespeare. [1]

    At Binfield, he also began to make many important friends. One of them, John Caryll (the future dedicatee of The Rape of the Lock ), was twenty years older than the poet and had made many acquaintances in the London literary world. He introduced the young Pope to the ageing playwright William Wycherley and to William Walsh, a minor poet, who helped Pope revise his first major work, The Pastorals. He also met the Blount sisters, Teresa and Martha , both of whom would remain lifelong friends. [5]

    Pope''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "Essay on Criticism" is a didactic poem in heroic couplets, begun, perhaps, as early as 1705, and published, anonymously, in 1711. The poetic essay was a relatively new genre, and the "Essay" itself was Pope''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s most ambitious work to that time. It was in part an attempt on Pope''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s part to identify and refine his own positions as poet and critic, and his response to an ongoing critical debate which centered on the question of whether poetry should be "natural" or written according to predetermined "artificial" rules inherited from the classical past.

    Pope then proceeds to discuss the laws by which a critic should be guided insisting, as any good poet would, that critics exist to serve poets, not to attack them. He then provides, by way of example, instances of critics who had erred in one fashion or another. What, in Pope''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s opinion (here as elsewhere in his work) is the deadliest critical sin a sin which is itself a reflection of a greater sin? All of his erring critics, each in their own way, betray the same fatal flaw.

    Throughout the poem, Pope refers to ancient writers such as Virgil , Homer , Aristotle , Horace and Longinus. This is a testament to his belief that the "Imitation of the ancients" is the ultimate standard for taste. Pope also says, "True ease in writing comes from art, not chance, / As those move easiest who have learned to dance" (362–363), meaning poets are made, not born.

    As is usual in Pope''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s poems, the Essay concludes with a reference to Pope himself. Walsh, the last of the critics mentioned, was a mentor and friend of Pope who had died in 1710.

    The following entry presents criticism of Pope''''''''''''''''s poem The Rape of the Lock (written in two cantos in 1712, later expanded to five cantos in 1714, and slightly revised in 1717). See also, Alexander Pope Criticism and An Essay on Man Criticism.

    Memoirs of the Extraordinary Life, Works, and Discoveries of Martinus Scriblerus [With John Arbuthnot, John Gay, Thomas Parnell, and Jonathan Swift] (satire) 1737

    The Augustans'''''''' love for the classics is reflected in these lines. Here, Pope is waxing lyrical about what a wonderful writer the ancient poet Horace was.

    According to Pope, Horace is great at talking us "into Sense." He conveys to us "the truest Notions in the easiest way." Basically, if you ask Pope, Horace is so much better than all those hacks writing during Pope''''''''s own time, who " judge with Fury , but… write with Fle''''''''me. "


    This is one of the profoundest poems I have ever read or hope to read. (Report) Reply

  10. author
    organicbear735 18 Jan 2017 04:18

    Alexander Pope (21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744) was an 18th-century English poet. He is best known for his satirical verse, as well as for his translation of Homer. Famous for his use of the heroic couplet , he is the second-most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations after Shakespeare. [1]

    At Binfield, he also began to make many important friends. One of them, John Caryll (the future dedicatee of The Rape of the Lock ), was twenty years older than the poet and had made many acquaintances in the London literary world. He introduced the young Pope to the ageing playwright William Wycherley and to William Walsh, a minor poet, who helped Pope revise his first major work, The Pastorals. He also met the Blount sisters, Teresa and Martha , both of whom would remain lifelong friends. [5]

    Pope''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s "Essay on Criticism" is a didactic poem in heroic couplets, begun, perhaps, as early as 1705, and published, anonymously, in 1711. The poetic essay was a relatively new genre, and the "Essay" itself was Pope''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s most ambitious work to that time. It was in part an attempt on Pope''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s part to identify and refine his own positions as poet and critic, and his response to an ongoing critical debate which centered on the question of whether poetry should be "natural" or written according to predetermined "artificial" rules inherited from the classical past.

    Pope then proceeds to discuss the laws by which a critic should be guided insisting, as any good poet would, that critics exist to serve poets, not to attack them. He then provides, by way of example, instances of critics who had erred in one fashion or another. What, in Pope''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s opinion (here as elsewhere in his work) is the deadliest critical sin a sin which is itself a reflection of a greater sin? All of his erring critics, each in their own way, betray the same fatal flaw.

    Throughout the poem, Pope refers to ancient writers such as Virgil , Homer , Aristotle , Horace and Longinus. This is a testament to his belief that the "Imitation of the ancients" is the ultimate standard for taste. Pope also says, "True ease in writing comes from art, not chance, / As those move easiest who have learned to dance" (362–363), meaning poets are made, not born.

    As is usual in Pope''''''''''''''''s poems, the Essay concludes with a reference to Pope himself. Walsh, the last of the critics mentioned, was a mentor and friend of Pope who had died in 1710.

    The following entry presents criticism of Pope''s poem The Rape of the Lock (written in two cantos in 1712, later expanded to five cantos in 1714, and slightly revised in 1717). See also, Alexander Pope Criticism and An Essay on Man Criticism.

    Memoirs of the Extraordinary Life, Works, and Discoveries of Martinus Scriblerus [With John Arbuthnot, John Gay, Thomas Parnell, and Jonathan Swift] (satire) 1737

    The Augustans' love for the classics is reflected in these lines. Here, Pope is waxing lyrical about what a wonderful writer the ancient poet Horace was.

    According to Pope, Horace is great at talking us "into Sense." He conveys to us "the truest Notions in the easiest way." Basically, if you ask Pope, Horace is so much better than all those hacks writing during Pope's own time, who " judge with Fury , but… write with Fle'me. "

  11. author
    Ш Ø L ₣ . вʟιиĸ 18 Jan 2017 02:50

    Alexander Pope (21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744) was an 18th-century English poet. He is best known for his satirical verse, as well as for his translation of Homer. Famous for his use of the heroic couplet , he is the second-most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations after Shakespeare. [1]

    At Binfield, he also began to make many important friends. One of them, John Caryll (the future dedicatee of The Rape of the Lock ), was twenty years older than the poet and had made many acquaintances in the London literary world. He introduced the young Pope to the ageing playwright William Wycherley and to William Walsh, a minor poet, who helped Pope revise his first major work, The Pastorals. He also met the Blount sisters, Teresa and Martha , both of whom would remain lifelong friends. [5]

  12. author
    WarrenMarcia 17 Jan 2017 22:03

    Alexander Pope (21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744) was an 18th-century English poet. He is best known for his satirical verse, as well as for his translation of Homer. Famous for his use of the heroic couplet , he is the second-most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations after Shakespeare. [1]

    At Binfield, he also began to make many important friends. One of them, John Caryll (the future dedicatee of The Rape of the Lock ), was twenty years older than the poet and had made many acquaintances in the London literary world. He introduced the young Pope to the ageing playwright William Wycherley and to William Walsh, a minor poet, who helped Pope revise his first major work, The Pastorals. He also met the Blount sisters, Teresa and Martha , both of whom would remain lifelong friends. [5]

    Pope''''''''s "Essay on Criticism" is a didactic poem in heroic couplets, begun, perhaps, as early as 1705, and published, anonymously, in 1711. The poetic essay was a relatively new genre, and the "Essay" itself was Pope''''''''s most ambitious work to that time. It was in part an attempt on Pope''''''''s part to identify and refine his own positions as poet and critic, and his response to an ongoing critical debate which centered on the question of whether poetry should be "natural" or written according to predetermined "artificial" rules inherited from the classical past.

    Pope then proceeds to discuss the laws by which a critic should be guided insisting, as any good poet would, that critics exist to serve poets, not to attack them. He then provides, by way of example, instances of critics who had erred in one fashion or another. What, in Pope''''''''s opinion (here as elsewhere in his work) is the deadliest critical sin a sin which is itself a reflection of a greater sin? All of his erring critics, each in their own way, betray the same fatal flaw.

    Throughout the poem, Pope refers to ancient writers such as Virgil , Homer , Aristotle , Horace and Longinus. This is a testament to his belief that the "Imitation of the ancients" is the ultimate standard for taste. Pope also says, "True ease in writing comes from art, not chance, / As those move easiest who have learned to dance" (362–363), meaning poets are made, not born.

    As is usual in Pope''''s poems, the Essay concludes with a reference to Pope himself. Walsh, the last of the critics mentioned, was a mentor and friend of Pope who had died in 1710.

  13. author
    greensnake451 18 Jan 2017 02:16

    Alexander Pope (21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744) was an 18th-century English poet. He is best known for his satirical verse, as well as for his translation of Homer. Famous for his use of the heroic couplet , he is the second-most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations after Shakespeare. [1]

    At Binfield, he also began to make many important friends. One of them, John Caryll (the future dedicatee of The Rape of the Lock ), was twenty years older than the poet and had made many acquaintances in the London literary world. He introduced the young Pope to the ageing playwright William Wycherley and to William Walsh, a minor poet, who helped Pope revise his first major work, The Pastorals. He also met the Blount sisters, Teresa and Martha , both of whom would remain lifelong friends. [5]

    Pope''''s "Essay on Criticism" is a didactic poem in heroic couplets, begun, perhaps, as early as 1705, and published, anonymously, in 1711. The poetic essay was a relatively new genre, and the "Essay" itself was Pope''''s most ambitious work to that time. It was in part an attempt on Pope''''s part to identify and refine his own positions as poet and critic, and his response to an ongoing critical debate which centered on the question of whether poetry should be "natural" or written according to predetermined "artificial" rules inherited from the classical past.

    Pope then proceeds to discuss the laws by which a critic should be guided insisting, as any good poet would, that critics exist to serve poets, not to attack them. He then provides, by way of example, instances of critics who had erred in one fashion or another. What, in Pope''''s opinion (here as elsewhere in his work) is the deadliest critical sin a sin which is itself a reflection of a greater sin? All of his erring critics, each in their own way, betray the same fatal flaw.

    Throughout the poem, Pope refers to ancient writers such as Virgil , Homer , Aristotle , Horace and Longinus. This is a testament to his belief that the "Imitation of the ancients" is the ultimate standard for taste. Pope also says, "True ease in writing comes from art, not chance, / As those move easiest who have learned to dance" (362–363), meaning poets are made, not born.

    As is usual in Pope''s poems, the Essay concludes with a reference to Pope himself. Walsh, the last of the critics mentioned, was a mentor and friend of Pope who had died in 1710.

  14. author
    tinyfish634 18 Jan 2017 05:37

    Alexander Pope (21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744) was an 18th-century English poet. He is best known for his satirical verse, as well as for his translation of Homer. Famous for his use of the heroic couplet , he is the second-most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations after Shakespeare. [1]

    At Binfield, he also began to make many important friends. One of them, John Caryll (the future dedicatee of The Rape of the Lock ), was twenty years older than the poet and had made many acquaintances in the London literary world. He introduced the young Pope to the ageing playwright William Wycherley and to William Walsh, a minor poet, who helped Pope revise his first major work, The Pastorals. He also met the Blount sisters, Teresa and Martha , both of whom would remain lifelong friends. [5]

    Pope''''''''''''''''s "Essay on Criticism" is a didactic poem in heroic couplets, begun, perhaps, as early as 1705, and published, anonymously, in 1711. The poetic essay was a relatively new genre, and the "Essay" itself was Pope''''''''''''''''s most ambitious work to that time. It was in part an attempt on Pope''''''''''''''''s part to identify and refine his own positions as poet and critic, and his response to an ongoing critical debate which centered on the question of whether poetry should be "natural" or written according to predetermined "artificial" rules inherited from the classical past.

    Pope then proceeds to discuss the laws by which a critic should be guided insisting, as any good poet would, that critics exist to serve poets, not to attack them. He then provides, by way of example, instances of critics who had erred in one fashion or another. What, in Pope''''''''''''''''s opinion (here as elsewhere in his work) is the deadliest critical sin a sin which is itself a reflection of a greater sin? All of his erring critics, each in their own way, betray the same fatal flaw.

    Throughout the poem, Pope refers to ancient writers such as Virgil , Homer , Aristotle , Horace and Longinus. This is a testament to his belief that the "Imitation of the ancients" is the ultimate standard for taste. Pope also says, "True ease in writing comes from art, not chance, / As those move easiest who have learned to dance" (362–363), meaning poets are made, not born.

    As is usual in Pope''''''''s poems, the Essay concludes with a reference to Pope himself. Walsh, the last of the critics mentioned, was a mentor and friend of Pope who had died in 1710.

    The following entry presents criticism of Pope's poem The Rape of the Lock (written in two cantos in 1712, later expanded to five cantos in 1714, and slightly revised in 1717). See also, Alexander Pope Criticism and An Essay on Man Criticism.

    Memoirs of the Extraordinary Life, Works, and Discoveries of Martinus Scriblerus [With John Arbuthnot, John Gay, Thomas Parnell, and Jonathan Swift] (satire) 1737

  15. author
    тейヾ 17 Jan 2017 23:07

    Alexander Pope (21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744) was an 18th-century English poet. He is best known for his satirical verse, as well as for his translation of Homer. Famous for his use of the heroic couplet , he is the second-most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations after Shakespeare. [1]

    At Binfield, he also began to make many important friends. One of them, John Caryll (the future dedicatee of The Rape of the Lock ), was twenty years older than the poet and had made many acquaintances in the London literary world. He introduced the young Pope to the ageing playwright William Wycherley and to William Walsh, a minor poet, who helped Pope revise his first major work, The Pastorals. He also met the Blount sisters, Teresa and Martha , both of whom would remain lifelong friends. [5]

    Pope''s "Essay on Criticism" is a didactic poem in heroic couplets, begun, perhaps, as early as 1705, and published, anonymously, in 1711. The poetic essay was a relatively new genre, and the "Essay" itself was Pope''s most ambitious work to that time. It was in part an attempt on Pope''s part to identify and refine his own positions as poet and critic, and his response to an ongoing critical debate which centered on the question of whether poetry should be "natural" or written according to predetermined "artificial" rules inherited from the classical past.

    Pope then proceeds to discuss the laws by which a critic should be guided insisting, as any good poet would, that critics exist to serve poets, not to attack them. He then provides, by way of example, instances of critics who had erred in one fashion or another. What, in Pope''s opinion (here as elsewhere in his work) is the deadliest critical sin a sin which is itself a reflection of a greater sin? All of his erring critics, each in their own way, betray the same fatal flaw.

    Throughout the poem, Pope refers to ancient writers such as Virgil , Homer , Aristotle , Horace and Longinus. This is a testament to his belief that the "Imitation of the ancients" is the ultimate standard for taste. Pope also says, "True ease in writing comes from art, not chance, / As those move easiest who have learned to dance" (362–363), meaning poets are made, not born.

    As is usual in Pope's poems, the Essay concludes with a reference to Pope himself. Walsh, the last of the critics mentioned, was a mentor and friend of Pope who had died in 1710.