14

Great Gatsby Quote Help!?

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: User1490810115 | Category: Restaurant server resume sample

Daisy speaks these words in Chapter 1 as she describes to Nick and Jordan her hopes for her infant daughter. While not directly relevant to the novel’s main themes, this quote offers a revealing glimpse into Daisy’s character. Daisy is not a fool herself but is the product of a social environment that, to a great extent, does not value intelligence in women. The older generation values subservience and docility in females, and the younger generation values thoughtless giddiness and pleasure-seeking. Daisy’s remark is somewhat sardonic: while she refers to the social values of her era, she does not seem to challenge them. Instead, she describes her own boredom with life and seems to imply that a girl can have more fun if she is beautiful and simplistic. Daisy herself often tries to act such a part. She conforms to the social standard of American femininity in the 1920s in order to avoid such tension-filled issues as her undying love for Gatsby.

This passage occurs in Chapter 3 as part of Nick’s first close examination of Gatsby’s character and appearance. This description of Gatsby’s smile captures both the theatrical quality of Gatsby’s character and his charisma. Additionally, it encapsulates the manner in which Gatsby appears to the outside world, an image Fitzgerald slowly deconstructs as the novel progresses toward Gatsby’s death in Chapter 8. One of the main facets of Gatsby’s persona is that he acts out a role that he defined for himself when he was seventeen years old. His smile seems to be both an important part of the role and a result of the singular combination of hope and imagination that enables him to play it so effectively. Here, Nick describes Gatsby’s rare focus he has the ability to make anyone he smiles at feel as though he has chosen that person out of “the whole external world,” reflecting that person’s most optimistic conception of him- or herself.

Comments
  1. author
    silvermouse343 17 Jan 2017 22:29

    Till she cry, ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Lover, gold-hatted, high-bouncing lover,
    I must have you!''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
    - Thomas Parke D''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Invilliers
    The Great Gatsby
    Epigraph.

    In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ve been turning over in my mind ever since.
    ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Whenever you feel like criticizing any one,'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' he told me, ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''just remember that all the people in this world haven''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t had the advantages that you''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ve had.''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
    The Great Gatsby
    Chapter 1, opening words set tone for a story about class and society. Right away we know the that narrator Nick Carraway is privileged and is very conscious of it.

    Nick does not get drunk at Gatsby''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s party--in chapter two, he gets drunk at Tom and Myrtle''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s party. Gatsby''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s party does not occur until chapter three.

    In The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald uses a variety of literary devices to portray the American Dream. One example is the the green light that symbolizes Gatsby’s hopes and dreams for a life with Daisy. Another symbol is the Valley of the Ashes, which represents the ugly consequences of America’s obsession with wealth. Fitzgerald uses these symbols to convey the illusory nature of the American Dream.

    Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

    In the novel’s opening lines, Nick Caraway recounts this important piece of counsel from his father. He presents himself as a character who is simultaneously privileged and empathetic.

    This statement establishes, first, the high socioeconomic status enjoyed by most of the protagonists in the novel. Though Nick is far from the wealthiest character, his ties to old money and academic pedigree as a Yale graduate bring him into contact with the élite of both West and East Egg. Yet this line also immediately creates a level of distance from those élite: Nick is aware of his position and actively seeks to treat those from all walks of life with respect. He thus establishes himself as not only an accepting character, but also a relatively impartial narrator.

    This classic novel, set during the "Jazz Age" (the 1920s) in a young postwar America, is the coming-of-age story of an idealistic young financier who, over the course of a memorable summer, learns uncomfortable truths about the relationships between truth and illusion, between past and present. The narrative, written during the time in which it is set by an author who was part of the high-living crowd within which the action.

    Want more deets? We''ve also got a complete Online Course about The Great Gatsby , with three weeks worth of readings and activities to make sure you know your stuff.

    Let''s play a game called Free Association. When we say the words " Roaring Twenties ," what are the first things that pop into your head? Go for it. We''ll wait here for you.

  2. author
    малявочка 17 Jan 2017 23:21

    This essay examines the fall of the American Dream in The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald and the consequences of the failure of this dream The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald examines the fall of the American Dream and the consequences of the failure of this dream. Through Jay Gatsby of West Egg, the Buchanan?s of East Egg and the Wilson?s of The Valley of Ashes the full implications of the American Dream are realised. The corruption and degradation of the American Dream are the source of this ?foul dust? and any attempts to salvage this fallen dream are futile. The American Dream describes an attitude of hope and faith, which goes back to the beginning of American civilisation, back to the first pilgrims. It relates to the desire for spiritual and material improvement, but this dream became corrupted. The material aspect of the dream was quickly and easily realised and wiped out these spiritual ideals. So there emerged a state of material comfort but lacking in spiritual life and purpose. The Great Gatsby is not a text that criticises the American Dream, but is a text critical of the corruption of the American dream. This aspect of the corruption of the American Dream is embodied by the Buchanan?s, while the spiritual ideals and purpose in life is by Jay Gatsby, where the ideals of the American Dream are still very much alive. Gatsby is juxtaposed against Tom and Daisy Buchanan; they both represent extremes of the American Dream, each as destructive as the other. Gatsby?s dream is self destructive, whereas the Buchanan lifestyle destroys others. Also, Gatsby centers on the dream, and has a purpose in life. He represents the idealism of the American Dream. The Buchanan?s symbolise the destruction of the American Dream, the corruption of values and the vulgar pursuit of wealth so evident in 1920?s American society. People like Tom and Daisy cannot see beyond the material values, but Gatsby cannot see beyond the dream and is cut off totally from the rational and practical by this. This explains why Gatsby is vulnerable and dies in the pursuit of his dream whereas the Buchanans and the corruption of the American dream escape unscathed. READ MORE http://classicsnetwork.com/essays/the-great-gatsby-is-a-devastating/524 AAA

  3. author
    blueelephant373 18 Jan 2017 01:35

    New! Compare The Great Gatsby with over 398 other LitCharts using the LitCharts Comparison Tool

  4. author
    User1488498779 18 Jan 2017 03:50

    Till she cry, ''''''''Lover, gold-hatted, high-bouncing lover,
    I must have you!''''''''
    - Thomas Parke D''''''''Invilliers
    The Great Gatsby
    Epigraph.

    In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I''''''''ve been turning over in my mind ever since.
    ''''''''Whenever you feel like criticizing any one,'''''''' he told me, ''''''''just remember that all the people in this world haven''''''''t had the advantages that you''''''''ve had.''''''''
    The Great Gatsby
    Chapter 1, opening words set tone for a story about class and society. Right away we know the that narrator Nick Carraway is privileged and is very conscious of it.

    Nick does not get drunk at Gatsby''''s party--in chapter two, he gets drunk at Tom and Myrtle''''s party. Gatsby''''s party does not occur until chapter three.

    In The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald uses a variety of literary devices to portray the American Dream. One example is the the green light that symbolizes Gatsby’s hopes and dreams for a life with Daisy. Another symbol is the Valley of the Ashes, which represents the ugly consequences of America’s obsession with wealth. Fitzgerald uses these symbols to convey the illusory nature of the American Dream.

    Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

    In the novel’s opening lines, Nick Caraway recounts this important piece of counsel from his father. He presents himself as a character who is simultaneously privileged and empathetic.

    This statement establishes, first, the high socioeconomic status enjoyed by most of the protagonists in the novel. Though Nick is far from the wealthiest character, his ties to old money and academic pedigree as a Yale graduate bring him into contact with the élite of both West and East Egg. Yet this line also immediately creates a level of distance from those élite: Nick is aware of his position and actively seeks to treat those from all walks of life with respect. He thus establishes himself as not only an accepting character, but also a relatively impartial narrator.

  5. author
    goldenleopard908 18 Jan 2017 08:08

    Till she cry, ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Lover, gold-hatted, high-bouncing lover,
    I must have you!''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
    - Thomas Parke D''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Invilliers
    The Great Gatsby
    Epigraph.

    In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ve been turning over in my mind ever since.
    ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Whenever you feel like criticizing any one,'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' he told me, ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''just remember that all the people in this world haven''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t had the advantages that you''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ve had.''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
    The Great Gatsby
    Chapter 1, opening words set tone for a story about class and society. Right away we know the that narrator Nick Carraway is privileged and is very conscious of it.

    Nick does not get drunk at Gatsby''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s party--in chapter two, he gets drunk at Tom and Myrtle''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s party. Gatsby''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s party does not occur until chapter three.

    In The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald uses a variety of literary devices to portray the American Dream. One example is the the green light that symbolizes Gatsby’s hopes and dreams for a life with Daisy. Another symbol is the Valley of the Ashes, which represents the ugly consequences of America’s obsession with wealth. Fitzgerald uses these symbols to convey the illusory nature of the American Dream.

    Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

    In the novel’s opening lines, Nick Caraway recounts this important piece of counsel from his father. He presents himself as a character who is simultaneously privileged and empathetic.

    This statement establishes, first, the high socioeconomic status enjoyed by most of the protagonists in the novel. Though Nick is far from the wealthiest character, his ties to old money and academic pedigree as a Yale graduate bring him into contact with the élite of both West and East Egg. Yet this line also immediately creates a level of distance from those élite: Nick is aware of his position and actively seeks to treat those from all walks of life with respect. He thus establishes himself as not only an accepting character, but also a relatively impartial narrator.

    This classic novel, set during the "Jazz Age" (the 1920s) in a young postwar America, is the coming-of-age story of an idealistic young financier who, over the course of a memorable summer, learns uncomfortable truths about the relationships between truth and illusion, between past and present. The narrative, written during the time in which it is set by an author who was part of the high-living crowd within which the action.

    Want more deets? We''''''''ve also got a complete Online Course about The Great Gatsby , with three weeks worth of readings and activities to make sure you know your stuff.

    Let''''''''s play a game called Free Association. When we say the words " Roaring Twenties ," what are the first things that pop into your head? Go for it. We''''''''ll wait here for you.

    A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

    Novelguide.com is the premier free source for literary analysis on the web. We provide an educational supplement for better understanding of classic and contemporary literature. Novelguide.com is continually in the process of adding more books to the website each week. Please check back weekly to see what we have added. Please let us know if you have any suggestions or comments or would like any additional information. Thanks for checking out our website. More Details

  6. author
    bigkoala640 18 Jan 2017 00:51

    Till she cry, ''''Lover, gold-hatted, high-bouncing lover,
    I must have you!''''
    - Thomas Parke D''''Invilliers
    The Great Gatsby
    Epigraph.

    In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I''''ve been turning over in my mind ever since.
    ''''Whenever you feel like criticizing any one,'''' he told me, ''''just remember that all the people in this world haven''''t had the advantages that you''''ve had.''''
    The Great Gatsby
    Chapter 1, opening words set tone for a story about class and society. Right away we know the that narrator Nick Carraway is privileged and is very conscious of it.

    Nick does not get drunk at Gatsby''s party--in chapter two, he gets drunk at Tom and Myrtle''s party. Gatsby''s party does not occur until chapter three.

    In The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald uses a variety of literary devices to portray the American Dream. One example is the the green light that symbolizes Gatsby’s hopes and dreams for a life with Daisy. Another symbol is the Valley of the Ashes, which represents the ugly consequences of America’s obsession with wealth. Fitzgerald uses these symbols to convey the illusory nature of the American Dream.

    Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

  7. author
    Виктор Гуменюк 18 Jan 2017 05:01

    Till she cry, ''Lover, gold-hatted, high-bouncing lover,
    I must have you!''
    - Thomas Parke D''Invilliers
    The Great Gatsby
    Epigraph.

    In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I''ve been turning over in my mind ever since.
    ''Whenever you feel like criticizing any one,'' he told me, ''just remember that all the people in this world haven''t had the advantages that you''ve had.''
    The Great Gatsby
    Chapter 1, opening words set tone for a story about class and society. Right away we know the that narrator Nick Carraway is privileged and is very conscious of it.

    Nick does not get drunk at Gatsby's party--in chapter two, he gets drunk at Tom and Myrtle's party. Gatsby's party does not occur until chapter three.

  8. author
    tinykoala347 18 Jan 2017 07:18

    Till she cry, 'Lover, gold-hatted, high-bouncing lover,
    I must have you!'
    - Thomas Parke D'Invilliers
    The Great Gatsby
    Epigraph.

    In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I've been turning over in my mind ever since.
    'Whenever you feel like criticizing any one,' he told me, 'just remember that all the people in this world haven't had the advantages that you've had.'
    The Great Gatsby
    Chapter 1, opening words set tone for a story about class and society. Right away we know the that narrator Nick Carraway is privileged and is very conscious of it.

  9. author
     ➰ Р А З Я  ➰ 17 Jan 2017 22:02

    Till she cry, ''''''''''''''''Lover, gold-hatted, high-bouncing lover,
    I must have you!''''''''''''''''
    - Thomas Parke D''''''''''''''''Invilliers
    The Great Gatsby
    Epigraph.

    In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I''''''''''''''''ve been turning over in my mind ever since.
    ''''''''''''''''Whenever you feel like criticizing any one,'''''''''''''''' he told me, ''''''''''''''''just remember that all the people in this world haven''''''''''''''''t had the advantages that you''''''''''''''''ve had.''''''''''''''''
    The Great Gatsby
    Chapter 1, opening words set tone for a story about class and society. Right away we know the that narrator Nick Carraway is privileged and is very conscious of it.

    Nick does not get drunk at Gatsby''''''''s party--in chapter two, he gets drunk at Tom and Myrtle''''''''s party. Gatsby''''''''s party does not occur until chapter three.

    In The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald uses a variety of literary devices to portray the American Dream. One example is the the green light that symbolizes Gatsby’s hopes and dreams for a life with Daisy. Another symbol is the Valley of the Ashes, which represents the ugly consequences of America’s obsession with wealth. Fitzgerald uses these symbols to convey the illusory nature of the American Dream.

    Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

    In the novel’s opening lines, Nick Caraway recounts this important piece of counsel from his father. He presents himself as a character who is simultaneously privileged and empathetic.

    This statement establishes, first, the high socioeconomic status enjoyed by most of the protagonists in the novel. Though Nick is far from the wealthiest character, his ties to old money and academic pedigree as a Yale graduate bring him into contact with the élite of both West and East Egg. Yet this line also immediately creates a level of distance from those élite: Nick is aware of his position and actively seeks to treat those from all walks of life with respect. He thus establishes himself as not only an accepting character, but also a relatively impartial narrator.

    This classic novel, set during the "Jazz Age" (the 1920s) in a young postwar America, is the coming-of-age story of an idealistic young financier who, over the course of a memorable summer, learns uncomfortable truths about the relationships between truth and illusion, between past and present. The narrative, written during the time in which it is set by an author who was part of the high-living crowd within which the action.

  10. author
    ClassicBet 18 Jan 2017 06:28

    Till she cry, ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Lover, gold-hatted, high-bouncing lover,
    I must have you!''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
    - Thomas Parke D''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Invilliers
    The Great Gatsby
    Epigraph.

    In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ve been turning over in my mind ever since.
    ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Whenever you feel like criticizing any one,'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' he told me, ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''just remember that all the people in this world haven''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t had the advantages that you''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ve had.''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
    The Great Gatsby
    Chapter 1, opening words set tone for a story about class and society. Right away we know the that narrator Nick Carraway is privileged and is very conscious of it.

    Nick does not get drunk at Gatsby''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s party--in chapter two, he gets drunk at Tom and Myrtle''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s party. Gatsby''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s party does not occur until chapter three.

    In The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald uses a variety of literary devices to portray the American Dream. One example is the the green light that symbolizes Gatsby’s hopes and dreams for a life with Daisy. Another symbol is the Valley of the Ashes, which represents the ugly consequences of America’s obsession with wealth. Fitzgerald uses these symbols to convey the illusory nature of the American Dream.

    Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

    In the novel’s opening lines, Nick Caraway recounts this important piece of counsel from his father. He presents himself as a character who is simultaneously privileged and empathetic.

    This statement establishes, first, the high socioeconomic status enjoyed by most of the protagonists in the novel. Though Nick is far from the wealthiest character, his ties to old money and academic pedigree as a Yale graduate bring him into contact with the élite of both West and East Egg. Yet this line also immediately creates a level of distance from those élite: Nick is aware of his position and actively seeks to treat those from all walks of life with respect. He thus establishes himself as not only an accepting character, but also a relatively impartial narrator.

    This classic novel, set during the "Jazz Age" (the 1920s) in a young postwar America, is the coming-of-age story of an idealistic young financier who, over the course of a memorable summer, learns uncomfortable truths about the relationships between truth and illusion, between past and present. The narrative, written during the time in which it is set by an author who was part of the high-living crowd within which the action.

    Want more deets? We''''ve also got a complete Online Course about The Great Gatsby , with three weeks worth of readings and activities to make sure you know your stuff.

    Let''''s play a game called Free Association. When we say the words " Roaring Twenties ," what are the first things that pop into your head? Go for it. We''''ll wait here for you.

  11. author
    whitemeercat702 18 Jan 2017 04:28

    Till she cry, ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Lover, gold-hatted, high-bouncing lover,
    I must have you!''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
    - Thomas Parke D''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Invilliers
    The Great Gatsby
    Epigraph.

    In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ve been turning over in my mind ever since.
    ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''Whenever you feel like criticizing any one,'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' he told me, ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''just remember that all the people in this world haven''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t had the advantages that you''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''ve had.''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
    The Great Gatsby
    Chapter 1, opening words set tone for a story about class and society. Right away we know the that narrator Nick Carraway is privileged and is very conscious of it.

    Nick does not get drunk at Gatsby''''''''''''''''s party--in chapter two, he gets drunk at Tom and Myrtle''''''''''''''''s party. Gatsby''''''''''''''''s party does not occur until chapter three.

    In The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald uses a variety of literary devices to portray the American Dream. One example is the the green light that symbolizes Gatsby’s hopes and dreams for a life with Daisy. Another symbol is the Valley of the Ashes, which represents the ugly consequences of America’s obsession with wealth. Fitzgerald uses these symbols to convey the illusory nature of the American Dream.

    Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

    In the novel’s opening lines, Nick Caraway recounts this important piece of counsel from his father. He presents himself as a character who is simultaneously privileged and empathetic.

    This statement establishes, first, the high socioeconomic status enjoyed by most of the protagonists in the novel. Though Nick is far from the wealthiest character, his ties to old money and academic pedigree as a Yale graduate bring him into contact with the élite of both West and East Egg. Yet this line also immediately creates a level of distance from those élite: Nick is aware of his position and actively seeks to treat those from all walks of life with respect. He thus establishes himself as not only an accepting character, but also a relatively impartial narrator.

    This classic novel, set during the "Jazz Age" (the 1920s) in a young postwar America, is the coming-of-age story of an idealistic young financier who, over the course of a memorable summer, learns uncomfortable truths about the relationships between truth and illusion, between past and present. The narrative, written during the time in which it is set by an author who was part of the high-living crowd within which the action.

    Want more deets? We've also got a complete Online Course about The Great Gatsby , with three weeks worth of readings and activities to make sure you know your stuff.

    Let's play a game called Free Association. When we say the words " Roaring Twenties ," what are the first things that pop into your head? Go for it. We'll wait here for you.

  12. author
    lazylion885 17 Jan 2017 22:39

    Click here american dream quotes in the great gatsby

    Daisy speaks these words in Chapter 1 as she describes to Nick and Jordan her hopes for her infant daughter. While not directly relevant to the novel’s main themes, this quote offers a revealing glimpse into Daisy’s character. Daisy is not a fool herself but is the product of a social environment that, to a great extent, does not value intelligence in women. The older generation values subservience and docility in females, and the younger generation values thoughtless giddiness and pleasure-seeking. Daisy’s remark is somewhat sardonic: while she refers to the social values of her era, she does not seem to challenge them. Instead, she describes her own boredom with life and seems to imply that a girl can have more fun if she is beautiful and simplistic. Daisy herself often tries to act such a part. She conforms to the social standard of American femininity in the 1920s in order to avoid such tension-filled issues as her undying love for Gatsby.

    This passage occurs in Chapter 3 as part of Nick’s first close examination of Gatsby’s character and appearance. This description of Gatsby’s smile captures both the theatrical quality of Gatsby’s character and his charisma. Additionally, it encapsulates the manner in which Gatsby appears to the outside world, an image Fitzgerald slowly deconstructs as the novel progresses toward Gatsby’s death in Chapter 8. One of the main facets of Gatsby’s persona is that he acts out a role that he defined for himself when he was seventeen years old. His smile seems to be both an important part of the role and a result of the singular combination of hope and imagination that enables him to play it so effectively. Here, Nick describes Gatsby’s rare focus he has the ability to make anyone he smiles at feel as though he has chosen that person out of “the whole external world,” reflecting that person’s most optimistic conception of him- or herself.

  13. author
    lazyelephant701 18 Jan 2017 02:04

    "Old sport"