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A Tale of Two Cities Themes | GradeSaver

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: crazyswan873 | Category: Resume sur la guerre de troie naura pas lieu

A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is a novel by Charles Dickens , set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. The novel depicts the plight of the French peasantry demoralized by the French aristocracy in the years leading up to the revolution, the corresponding brutality demonstrated by the revolutionaries toward the former aristocrats in the early years of the revolution, and many unflattering social parallels with life in London during the same period.

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way—in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only. [2]

Comments
  1. author
    greenmouse867 18 Jan 2017 06:21

    A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is a novel by Charles Dickens , set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. The novel depicts the plight of the French peasantry demoralized by the French aristocracy in the years leading up to the revolution, the corresponding brutality demonstrated by the revolutionaries toward the former aristocrats in the early years of the revolution, and many unflattering social parallels with life in London during the same period.

    Dickens''''s famous opening sentence introduces the universal approach of the book, the French Revolution, and the drama depicted within:

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she''s a villain in the story, and I don''t think we should be taking her word for it.

    A Tale of Two Cities is in part a historical novel, which sets it apart from Dickens s other work. Although Barnaby Rudge deals with the Gordon Riots in England, it discusses them only peripherally. In A Tale of Two Cities Dickens narrates aspects of a major historical event, the French Revolution. Because Dickens focuses on the effect of political upheaval more than on character development and wit, A Tale of Two Cities feels atypical among readers who know his other novels, and critics continue to debate its relative place in the English literary canon.

    This ambivalence is exemplified in his depiction of Madame Defarge, perhaps the most interesting of the main characters. She is ruthless in her desire for retribution against the wrongs that have been done to those of her class. Dickens indicates that Madame Defarge has good reason for her anger, but her death in a scuffle with Miss Pross at the end of the novel implies that Dickens cannot sympathize with the extent of her (or the revolutionaries ) ceaseless bloodthirstiness.

  2. author
    beautifultiger460 18 Jan 2017 05:42

    A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is a novel by Charles Dickens , set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. The novel depicts the plight of the French peasantry demoralized by the French aristocracy in the years leading up to the revolution, the corresponding brutality demonstrated by the revolutionaries toward the former aristocrats in the early years of the revolution, and many unflattering social parallels with life in London during the same period.

    Dickens''''''''s famous opening sentence introduces the universal approach of the book, the French Revolution, and the drama depicted within:

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she''''s a villain in the story, and I don''''t think we should be taking her word for it.

    A Tale of Two Cities is in part a historical novel, which sets it apart from Dickens s other work. Although Barnaby Rudge deals with the Gordon Riots in England, it discusses them only peripherally. In A Tale of Two Cities Dickens narrates aspects of a major historical event, the French Revolution. Because Dickens focuses on the effect of political upheaval more than on character development and wit, A Tale of Two Cities feels atypical among readers who know his other novels, and critics continue to debate its relative place in the English literary canon.

    This ambivalence is exemplified in his depiction of Madame Defarge, perhaps the most interesting of the main characters. She is ruthless in her desire for retribution against the wrongs that have been done to those of her class. Dickens indicates that Madame Defarge has good reason for her anger, but her death in a scuffle with Miss Pross at the end of the novel implies that Dickens cannot sympathize with the extent of her (or the revolutionaries ) ceaseless bloodthirstiness.

    When you think of the French Revolution, a few things spring immediately to mind. Marie Antoinette. The Bastille. The Guillotine. A Tale of Two Cities.

    Yes, in what is a totally weird twist, Charles Dickens, who spent the majority of his literary career penning the exploits of London underdogs, also happened to write a novel that has become crystallized in the public imagination as synonymous with the French Revolution. It's weird, but it's also super-true.

  3. author
    orangefrog800 18 Jan 2017 03:45

    A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is a novel by Charles Dickens , set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. The novel depicts the plight of the French peasantry demoralized by the French aristocracy in the years leading up to the revolution, the corresponding brutality demonstrated by the revolutionaries toward the former aristocrats in the early years of the revolution, and many unflattering social parallels with life in London during the same period.

    Dickens''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s famous opening sentence introduces the universal approach of the book, the French Revolution, and the drama depicted within:

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s a villain in the story, and I don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t think we should be taking her word for it.

    A Tale of Two Cities is in part a historical novel, which sets it apart from Dickens s other work. Although Barnaby Rudge deals with the Gordon Riots in England, it discusses them only peripherally. In A Tale of Two Cities Dickens narrates aspects of a major historical event, the French Revolution. Because Dickens focuses on the effect of political upheaval more than on character development and wit, A Tale of Two Cities feels atypical among readers who know his other novels, and critics continue to debate its relative place in the English literary canon.

    This ambivalence is exemplified in his depiction of Madame Defarge, perhaps the most interesting of the main characters. She is ruthless in her desire for retribution against the wrongs that have been done to those of her class. Dickens indicates that Madame Defarge has good reason for her anger, but her death in a scuffle with Miss Pross at the end of the novel implies that Dickens cannot sympathize with the extent of her (or the revolutionaries ) ceaseless bloodthirstiness.

    When you think of the French Revolution, a few things spring immediately to mind. Marie Antoinette. The Bastille. The Guillotine. A Tale of Two Cities.

    Yes, in what is a totally weird twist, Charles Dickens, who spent the majority of his literary career penning the exploits of London underdogs, also happened to write a novel that has become crystallized in the public imagination as synonymous with the French Revolution. It''''''''''''''''s weird, but it''''''''''''''''s also super-true.

    The most important resurrections in the novel are those of Charles Darnay. First, Sydney Carton s resemblance to him saves him from being convicted and executed in England, and then, the same resemblance allows the latter to switch places with him in the Conciergerie. These resurrections are surrounded with heavily religious language that compare Carton s sacrifice of his own life for others sins to Christ s sacrifice on the cross.

    One of the primary effects of the upheaval caused by the French Revolution was due to its literally revolutionary influence; it turned society upside down and banged it on its head. When Darnay returns to France, he observes that the noblemen are in prison, while criminals are their jailors. The replacement of Darnay with Carton at the end of the novel is another reversal, illustrating that a bad man can replace a good man in such a revolutionary society.

    A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other..

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she''s a villain in the story, and I don''t think we should be taking her word for it.

  4. author
    [email protected] 🎵 18 Jan 2017 02:15

    A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is a novel by Charles Dickens , set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. The novel depicts the plight of the French peasantry demoralized by the French aristocracy in the years leading up to the revolution, the corresponding brutality demonstrated by the revolutionaries toward the former aristocrats in the early years of the revolution, and many unflattering social parallels with life in London during the same period.

    Dickens''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s famous opening sentence introduces the universal approach of the book, the French Revolution, and the drama depicted within:

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she''''''''''''''''s a villain in the story, and I don''''''''''''''''t think we should be taking her word for it.

    A Tale of Two Cities is in part a historical novel, which sets it apart from Dickens s other work. Although Barnaby Rudge deals with the Gordon Riots in England, it discusses them only peripherally. In A Tale of Two Cities Dickens narrates aspects of a major historical event, the French Revolution. Because Dickens focuses on the effect of political upheaval more than on character development and wit, A Tale of Two Cities feels atypical among readers who know his other novels, and critics continue to debate its relative place in the English literary canon.

    This ambivalence is exemplified in his depiction of Madame Defarge, perhaps the most interesting of the main characters. She is ruthless in her desire for retribution against the wrongs that have been done to those of her class. Dickens indicates that Madame Defarge has good reason for her anger, but her death in a scuffle with Miss Pross at the end of the novel implies that Dickens cannot sympathize with the extent of her (or the revolutionaries ) ceaseless bloodthirstiness.

    When you think of the French Revolution, a few things spring immediately to mind. Marie Antoinette. The Bastille. The Guillotine. A Tale of Two Cities.

    Yes, in what is a totally weird twist, Charles Dickens, who spent the majority of his literary career penning the exploits of London underdogs, also happened to write a novel that has become crystallized in the public imagination as synonymous with the French Revolution. It''''s weird, but it''''s also super-true.

    The most important resurrections in the novel are those of Charles Darnay. First, Sydney Carton s resemblance to him saves him from being convicted and executed in England, and then, the same resemblance allows the latter to switch places with him in the Conciergerie. These resurrections are surrounded with heavily religious language that compare Carton s sacrifice of his own life for others sins to Christ s sacrifice on the cross.

    One of the primary effects of the upheaval caused by the French Revolution was due to its literally revolutionary influence; it turned society upside down and banged it on its head. When Darnay returns to France, he observes that the noblemen are in prison, while criminals are their jailors. The replacement of Darnay with Carton at the end of the novel is another reversal, illustrating that a bad man can replace a good man in such a revolutionary society.

  5. author
    silvergoose345 18 Jan 2017 04:42

    A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is a novel by Charles Dickens , set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. The novel depicts the plight of the French peasantry demoralized by the French aristocracy in the years leading up to the revolution, the corresponding brutality demonstrated by the revolutionaries toward the former aristocrats in the early years of the revolution, and many unflattering social parallels with life in London during the same period.

    Dickens''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s famous opening sentence introduces the universal approach of the book, the French Revolution, and the drama depicted within:

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s a villain in the story, and I don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t think we should be taking her word for it.

    A Tale of Two Cities is in part a historical novel, which sets it apart from Dickens s other work. Although Barnaby Rudge deals with the Gordon Riots in England, it discusses them only peripherally. In A Tale of Two Cities Dickens narrates aspects of a major historical event, the French Revolution. Because Dickens focuses on the effect of political upheaval more than on character development and wit, A Tale of Two Cities feels atypical among readers who know his other novels, and critics continue to debate its relative place in the English literary canon.

    This ambivalence is exemplified in his depiction of Madame Defarge, perhaps the most interesting of the main characters. She is ruthless in her desire for retribution against the wrongs that have been done to those of her class. Dickens indicates that Madame Defarge has good reason for her anger, but her death in a scuffle with Miss Pross at the end of the novel implies that Dickens cannot sympathize with the extent of her (or the revolutionaries ) ceaseless bloodthirstiness.

    When you think of the French Revolution, a few things spring immediately to mind. Marie Antoinette. The Bastille. The Guillotine. A Tale of Two Cities.

    Yes, in what is a totally weird twist, Charles Dickens, who spent the majority of his literary career penning the exploits of London underdogs, also happened to write a novel that has become crystallized in the public imagination as synonymous with the French Revolution. It''''''''s weird, but it''''''''s also super-true.

    The most important resurrections in the novel are those of Charles Darnay. First, Sydney Carton s resemblance to him saves him from being convicted and executed in England, and then, the same resemblance allows the latter to switch places with him in the Conciergerie. These resurrections are surrounded with heavily religious language that compare Carton s sacrifice of his own life for others sins to Christ s sacrifice on the cross.

    One of the primary effects of the upheaval caused by the French Revolution was due to its literally revolutionary influence; it turned society upside down and banged it on its head. When Darnay returns to France, he observes that the noblemen are in prison, while criminals are their jailors. The replacement of Darnay with Carton at the end of the novel is another reversal, illustrating that a bad man can replace a good man in such a revolutionary society.

    A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other....

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she's a villain in the story, and I don't think we should be taking her word for it.

  6. author
    Vi. 18 Jan 2017 03:11

    I know that your new best friend is CliffsNotes or Spark Notes. If Dickens weren t already dead. grrr.

  7. author
    goldenduck814 18 Jan 2017 09:28

    A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is a novel by Charles Dickens , set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. The novel depicts the plight of the French peasantry demoralized by the French aristocracy in the years leading up to the revolution, the corresponding brutality demonstrated by the revolutionaries toward the former aristocrats in the early years of the revolution, and many unflattering social parallels with life in London during the same period.

    Dickens''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s famous opening sentence introduces the universal approach of the book, the French Revolution, and the drama depicted within:

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s a villain in the story, and I don''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''t think we should be taking her word for it.

    A Tale of Two Cities is in part a historical novel, which sets it apart from Dickens s other work. Although Barnaby Rudge deals with the Gordon Riots in England, it discusses them only peripherally. In A Tale of Two Cities Dickens narrates aspects of a major historical event, the French Revolution. Because Dickens focuses on the effect of political upheaval more than on character development and wit, A Tale of Two Cities feels atypical among readers who know his other novels, and critics continue to debate its relative place in the English literary canon.

    This ambivalence is exemplified in his depiction of Madame Defarge, perhaps the most interesting of the main characters. She is ruthless in her desire for retribution against the wrongs that have been done to those of her class. Dickens indicates that Madame Defarge has good reason for her anger, but her death in a scuffle with Miss Pross at the end of the novel implies that Dickens cannot sympathize with the extent of her (or the revolutionaries ) ceaseless bloodthirstiness.

    When you think of the French Revolution, a few things spring immediately to mind. Marie Antoinette. The Bastille. The Guillotine. A Tale of Two Cities.

    Yes, in what is a totally weird twist, Charles Dickens, who spent the majority of his literary career penning the exploits of London underdogs, also happened to write a novel that has become crystallized in the public imagination as synonymous with the French Revolution. It''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s weird, but it''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s also super-true.

    The most important resurrections in the novel are those of Charles Darnay. First, Sydney Carton s resemblance to him saves him from being convicted and executed in England, and then, the same resemblance allows the latter to switch places with him in the Conciergerie. These resurrections are surrounded with heavily religious language that compare Carton s sacrifice of his own life for others sins to Christ s sacrifice on the cross.

    One of the primary effects of the upheaval caused by the French Revolution was due to its literally revolutionary influence; it turned society upside down and banged it on its head. When Darnay returns to France, he observes that the noblemen are in prison, while criminals are their jailors. The replacement of Darnay with Carton at the end of the novel is another reversal, illustrating that a bad man can replace a good man in such a revolutionary society.

    A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other..

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she''''s a villain in the story, and I don''''t think we should be taking her word for it.

  8. author
    yellowfish152 18 Jan 2017 06:25

  9. author
    blueduck323 18 Jan 2017 02:22

    A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is a novel by Charles Dickens , set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. The novel depicts the plight of the French peasantry demoralized by the French aristocracy in the years leading up to the revolution, the corresponding brutality demonstrated by the revolutionaries toward the former aristocrats in the early years of the revolution, and many unflattering social parallels with life in London during the same period.

    Dickens''''''''''''''''s famous opening sentence introduces the universal approach of the book, the French Revolution, and the drama depicted within:

    The paragraph about the theme that sacrifice is necessary is written like the writer believes the violence of the French Revolution (like the guillotine) was necessary, but to me it seemed like Dickens was clearly condemning the violence, if not the revolution itself. It also uses what Mrs. Defarge said to her husband, but she''''''''s a villain in the story, and I don''''''''t think we should be taking her word for it.

    A Tale of Two Cities is in part a historical novel, which sets it apart from Dickens s other work. Although Barnaby Rudge deals with the Gordon Riots in England, it discusses them only peripherally. In A Tale of Two Cities Dickens narrates aspects of a major historical event, the French Revolution. Because Dickens focuses on the effect of political upheaval more than on character development and wit, A Tale of Two Cities feels atypical among readers who know his other novels, and critics continue to debate its relative place in the English literary canon.

    This ambivalence is exemplified in his depiction of Madame Defarge, perhaps the most interesting of the main characters. She is ruthless in her desire for retribution against the wrongs that have been done to those of her class. Dickens indicates that Madame Defarge has good reason for her anger, but her death in a scuffle with Miss Pross at the end of the novel implies that Dickens cannot sympathize with the extent of her (or the revolutionaries ) ceaseless bloodthirstiness.

    When you think of the French Revolution, a few things spring immediately to mind. Marie Antoinette. The Bastille. The Guillotine. A Tale of Two Cities.

    Yes, in what is a totally weird twist, Charles Dickens, who spent the majority of his literary career penning the exploits of London underdogs, also happened to write a novel that has become crystallized in the public imagination as synonymous with the French Revolution. It''s weird, but it''s also super-true.

    The most important resurrections in the novel are those of Charles Darnay. First, Sydney Carton s resemblance to him saves him from being convicted and executed in England, and then, the same resemblance allows the latter to switch places with him in the Conciergerie. These resurrections are surrounded with heavily religious language that compare Carton s sacrifice of his own life for others sins to Christ s sacrifice on the cross.

    One of the primary effects of the upheaval caused by the French Revolution was due to its literally revolutionary influence; it turned society upside down and banged it on its head. When Darnay returns to France, he observes that the noblemen are in prison, while criminals are their jailors. The replacement of Darnay with Carton at the end of the novel is another reversal, illustrating that a bad man can replace a good man in such a revolutionary society.

  10. author
    ticklishwolf303 18 Jan 2017 06:46

    You could try doing the following: 1) go to the following website: http://www.quotesandpoem.com/literature/literaryworks/Dickens/A_Tale_of_Two_Cities 2) In the search dropdown box make sure A tale of two cities is selected and then search for keyword "resurrection". This should give you references to resurrection in the book. This is one quote relevant to resurrection from Chapter 39: "I am the resurrection and the life, saith the Lord: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live: and whosoever liveth and believeth in me, shall never die."