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A Rose for Emily help?

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: User1487830307 | Category: Resume sur la guerre de troie naura pas lieu

ARose for Emily Homework Help - Discover the eNotes.com community of teachers, mentors and students just like you that can answer any question you might.

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  1. author
    goldenpeacock969 18 Jan 2017 05:37

    The pseudo-chivalry of the townspeople comes out in several symbolic actions, such as when parents send their daughters to Miss Emily for china-painting lessons, when civic leaders spread lime around her yard to deal with the foul odor emanating from her house, and when Colonel Sartoris decrees that she will never have to pay local taxes. In contrast, Homer’s carriage—considered gaudy by the townspeople—symbolizes the difference between the town’s old-fashioned attitudes (reflective of the Old South) and Homer’s more modern one (reflective of the emerging New South).

    In this gothic story, though, perhaps the most vivid symbols are the locked room in Miss Emily’s house and the long iron-gray hair found on a pillow inside. The room symbolizes the secrecy and mystery associated with Miss Emily’s house and her relationship with Homer. The location of the hair as well as its color and length suggest a continuing interaction between Miss Emily and the corpse of Homer, again indicating her refusal to acknowledge the finality of death.

    No one had been in Emily’s house except for his servant Tobe. Emily during his life did not pay taxes ever since he met Colonel Sartoris simply because it was whispered by the past mayor that the city was indebted to her family. After the death of Homer, which the town people always thought that he had disappeared, there was a foul smell all around Emily’s house. The town people did not want an open confrontation with her and sorted to pour lime juice all over her property and with time the smell disappeared.

    In conclusion, the setting of this story was to explain the future generations and how they dealt with their legacy. This description helps us picture a decaying Mississippi town in the post-Civil War in the south. We are also able to see how Miss Emily resists change by all means. The room that was entered during Emily’s funeral helps to indicate the different physical details of the values, ideas and attitudes of the place in different times. Emily’s house was the only house that did not change while the others made theirs beautiful in the town.

    Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes! Turn and face the strange – Oh, hi there. Sorry about that. We were just singing along to David Bowie on our record player. Who''''''''''''''''s David Bowie, you ask? What''''''''''''''''s a record player?

    Okay, we get it. We try to be hip, but sometimes it''''''''''''''''s nice to visit the past. We might break out our David Bowie records, or even pop his cool movie into our VCR. You know, Labyrinth ? The one where he played the Goblin King? Oh right, that was back in 1986.

    Having over 200 employees who work distantly through our network makes it easy to complete any project any time of day. You can place your order during the night and will still have it done on time. That is the beauty of the Internet environment. If you place your order with DreamEssays.com, you can rest assured that your project will be done and will be done on time. If you order something really complicated and allow little time for completion, our writers will issue a prompt alert and will suggest a realistic time estimate, and it will be up to you whether or not to accept the offer.

    All client information is kept securely and will never be disclosed to anyone, neither your professor, nor your classmates. We respect the privacy of every visitor who comes to our site. For added security and confidentiality, payment authorization is carried out by 2checkout.com in a SSL-encrypted secure environment and we do not even have access to your billing information. The information we have access to (the contact details and project details) will never be shared with any third party, guaranteed.

  2. author
    юрий поташов 18 Jan 2017 06:55

    The pseudo-chivalry of the townspeople comes out in several symbolic actions, such as when parents send their daughters to Miss Emily for china-painting lessons, when civic leaders spread lime around her yard to deal with the foul odor emanating from her house, and when Colonel Sartoris decrees that she will never have to pay local taxes. In contrast, Homer’s carriage—considered gaudy by the townspeople—symbolizes the difference between the town’s old-fashioned attitudes (reflective of the Old South) and Homer’s more modern one (reflective of the emerging New South).

    In this gothic story, though, perhaps the most vivid symbols are the locked room in Miss Emily’s house and the long iron-gray hair found on a pillow inside. The room symbolizes the secrecy and mystery associated with Miss Emily’s house and her relationship with Homer. The location of the hair as well as its color and length suggest a continuing interaction between Miss Emily and the corpse of Homer, again indicating her refusal to acknowledge the finality of death.

    No one had been in Emily’s house except for his servant Tobe. Emily during his life did not pay taxes ever since he met Colonel Sartoris simply because it was whispered by the past mayor that the city was indebted to her family. After the death of Homer, which the town people always thought that he had disappeared, there was a foul smell all around Emily’s house. The town people did not want an open confrontation with her and sorted to pour lime juice all over her property and with time the smell disappeared.

    In conclusion, the setting of this story was to explain the future generations and how they dealt with their legacy. This description helps us picture a decaying Mississippi town in the post-Civil War in the south. We are also able to see how Miss Emily resists change by all means. The room that was entered during Emily’s funeral helps to indicate the different physical details of the values, ideas and attitudes of the place in different times. Emily’s house was the only house that did not change while the others made theirs beautiful in the town.

    Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes! Turn and face the strange – Oh, hi there. Sorry about that. We were just singing along to David Bowie on our record player. Who''''s David Bowie, you ask? What''''s a record player?

    Okay, we get it. We try to be hip, but sometimes it''''s nice to visit the past. We might break out our David Bowie records, or even pop his cool movie into our VCR. You know, Labyrinth ? The one where he played the Goblin King? Oh right, that was back in 1986.

    Having over 200 employees who work distantly through our network makes it easy to complete any project any time of day. You can place your order during the night and will still have it done on time. That is the beauty of the Internet environment. If you place your order with DreamEssays.com, you can rest assured that your project will be done and will be done on time. If you order something really complicated and allow little time for completion, our writers will issue a prompt alert and will suggest a realistic time estimate, and it will be up to you whether or not to accept the offer.

    All client information is kept securely and will never be disclosed to anyone, neither your professor, nor your classmates. We respect the privacy of every visitor who comes to our site. For added security and confidentiality, payment authorization is carried out by 2checkout.com in a SSL-encrypted secure environment and we do not even have access to your billing information. The information we have access to (the contact details and project details) will never be shared with any third party, guaranteed.

  3. author
    ι a м  🐚 18 Jan 2017 06:42

    William Faulkner once said, “Given a choice between grief and nothing, I'd choose grief” (Brainyquote). He further explains why he’d do this in “A.

  4. author
    smalltiger824 18 Jan 2017 07:56

    The pseudo-chivalry of the townspeople comes out in several symbolic actions, such as when parents send their daughters to Miss Emily for china-painting lessons, when civic leaders spread lime around her yard to deal with the foul odor emanating from her house, and when Colonel Sartoris decrees that she will never have to pay local taxes. In contrast, Homer’s carriage—considered gaudy by the townspeople—symbolizes the difference between the town’s old-fashioned attitudes (reflective of the Old South) and Homer’s more modern one (reflective of the emerging New South).

    In this gothic story, though, perhaps the most vivid symbols are the locked room in Miss Emily’s house and the long iron-gray hair found on a pillow inside. The room symbolizes the secrecy and mystery associated with Miss Emily’s house and her relationship with Homer. The location of the hair as well as its color and length suggest a continuing interaction between Miss Emily and the corpse of Homer, again indicating her refusal to acknowledge the finality of death.

    No one had been in Emily’s house except for his servant Tobe. Emily during his life did not pay taxes ever since he met Colonel Sartoris simply because it was whispered by the past mayor that the city was indebted to her family. After the death of Homer, which the town people always thought that he had disappeared, there was a foul smell all around Emily’s house. The town people did not want an open confrontation with her and sorted to pour lime juice all over her property and with time the smell disappeared.

    In conclusion, the setting of this story was to explain the future generations and how they dealt with their legacy. This description helps us picture a decaying Mississippi town in the post-Civil War in the south. We are also able to see how Miss Emily resists change by all means. The room that was entered during Emily’s funeral helps to indicate the different physical details of the values, ideas and attitudes of the place in different times. Emily’s house was the only house that did not change while the others made theirs beautiful in the town.

  5. author
    blackkoala417 18 Jan 2017 08:44

    The pseudo-chivalry of the townspeople comes out in several symbolic actions, such as when parents send their daughters to Miss Emily for china-painting lessons, when civic leaders spread lime around her yard to deal with the foul odor emanating from her house, and when Colonel Sartoris decrees that she will never have to pay local taxes. In contrast, Homer’s carriage—considered gaudy by the townspeople—symbolizes the difference between the town’s old-fashioned attitudes (reflective of the Old South) and Homer’s more modern one (reflective of the emerging New South).

    In this gothic story, though, perhaps the most vivid symbols are the locked room in Miss Emily’s house and the long iron-gray hair found on a pillow inside. The room symbolizes the secrecy and mystery associated with Miss Emily’s house and her relationship with Homer. The location of the hair as well as its color and length suggest a continuing interaction between Miss Emily and the corpse of Homer, again indicating her refusal to acknowledge the finality of death.

    No one had been in Emily’s house except for his servant Tobe. Emily during his life did not pay taxes ever since he met Colonel Sartoris simply because it was whispered by the past mayor that the city was indebted to her family. After the death of Homer, which the town people always thought that he had disappeared, there was a foul smell all around Emily’s house. The town people did not want an open confrontation with her and sorted to pour lime juice all over her property and with time the smell disappeared.

    In conclusion, the setting of this story was to explain the future generations and how they dealt with their legacy. This description helps us picture a decaying Mississippi town in the post-Civil War in the south. We are also able to see how Miss Emily resists change by all means. The room that was entered during Emily’s funeral helps to indicate the different physical details of the values, ideas and attitudes of the place in different times. Emily’s house was the only house that did not change while the others made theirs beautiful in the town.

    Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes! Turn and face the strange – Oh, hi there. Sorry about that. We were just singing along to David Bowie on our record player. Who''''''''s David Bowie, you ask? What''''''''s a record player?

    Okay, we get it. We try to be hip, but sometimes it''''''''s nice to visit the past. We might break out our David Bowie records, or even pop his cool movie into our VCR. You know, Labyrinth ? The one where he played the Goblin King? Oh right, that was back in 1986.

    Having over 200 employees who work distantly through our network makes it easy to complete any project any time of day. You can place your order during the night and will still have it done on time. That is the beauty of the Internet environment. If you place your order with DreamEssays.com, you can rest assured that your project will be done and will be done on time. If you order something really complicated and allow little time for completion, our writers will issue a prompt alert and will suggest a realistic time estimate, and it will be up to you whether or not to accept the offer.

    All client information is kept securely and will never be disclosed to anyone, neither your professor, nor your classmates. We respect the privacy of every visitor who comes to our site. For added security and confidentiality, payment authorization is carried out by 2checkout.com in a SSL-encrypted secure environment and we do not even have access to your billing information. The information we have access to (the contact details and project details) will never be shared with any third party, guaranteed.

  6. author
    goldengoose889 18 Jan 2017 03:56

    Do you mean an MA or PhD thesis on Emily Dickinson? I think there sould be some you can search from the web site below.

  7. author
    solar bless 17 Jan 2017 21:59

    A Rose for Emily - William Faulkner Below you will find five outstanding thesis statements for "A Rose for Emily" by William Faulkner that can be used as essay starters or paper topics. All five incorporate at least one of the major themes in "A Rose for Emily" and are broad enough so that it will be easy to find textual support, yet narrow enough to provide a focused clear thesis statement. http://www.paperstarter.com/rose_emily.htm Psychological Character Analysis of Emily http://www.articlemyriad.com/rose_emily_analysis.htm Summary This story is narrated through a third person s point of view. The story is told from the townspeople. The story starts off with Ms. Emily s funeral. It states that "the men through a sort of respectful affection for a fallen monument, the women mostly out of curiosity to see the inside of her house, which no one save an old man-servant--a combined gardener and cook--had seen in at least ten years." As we can see, Ms. Emily was sort of like a mystery to citizens of the town. More….. http://www.tqnyc.org/NYC040522/shortstories/roseforemily/AroseForemilymain.htm

  8. author
    MaicoTheMan Ж 18 Jan 2017 00:45

    The pseudo-chivalry of the townspeople comes out in several symbolic actions, such as when parents send their daughters to Miss Emily for china-painting lessons, when civic leaders spread lime around her yard to deal with the foul odor emanating from her house, and when Colonel Sartoris decrees that she will never have to pay local taxes. In contrast, Homer’s carriage—considered gaudy by the townspeople—symbolizes the difference between the town’s old-fashioned attitudes (reflective of the Old South) and Homer’s more modern one (reflective of the emerging New South).

    In this gothic story, though, perhaps the most vivid symbols are the locked room in Miss Emily’s house and the long iron-gray hair found on a pillow inside. The room symbolizes the secrecy and mystery associated with Miss Emily’s house and her relationship with Homer. The location of the hair as well as its color and length suggest a continuing interaction between Miss Emily and the corpse of Homer, again indicating her refusal to acknowledge the finality of death.

    No one had been in Emily’s house except for his servant Tobe. Emily during his life did not pay taxes ever since he met Colonel Sartoris simply because it was whispered by the past mayor that the city was indebted to her family. After the death of Homer, which the town people always thought that he had disappeared, there was a foul smell all around Emily’s house. The town people did not want an open confrontation with her and sorted to pour lime juice all over her property and with time the smell disappeared.

    In conclusion, the setting of this story was to explain the future generations and how they dealt with their legacy. This description helps us picture a decaying Mississippi town in the post-Civil War in the south. We are also able to see how Miss Emily resists change by all means. The room that was entered during Emily’s funeral helps to indicate the different physical details of the values, ideas and attitudes of the place in different times. Emily’s house was the only house that did not change while the others made theirs beautiful in the town.

    Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes! Turn and face the strange – Oh, hi there. Sorry about that. We were just singing along to David Bowie on our record player. Who's David Bowie, you ask? What's a record player?

    Okay, we get it. We try to be hip, but sometimes it's nice to visit the past. We might break out our David Bowie records, or even pop his cool movie into our VCR. You know, Labyrinth ? The one where he played the Goblin King? Oh right, that was back in 1986.

  9. author
    Сірко 18 Jan 2017 06:04

    The pseudo-chivalry of the townspeople comes out in several symbolic actions, such as when parents send their daughters to Miss Emily for china-painting lessons, when civic leaders spread lime around her yard to deal with the foul odor emanating from her house, and when Colonel Sartoris decrees that she will never have to pay local taxes. In contrast, Homer’s carriage—considered gaudy by the townspeople—symbolizes the difference between the town’s old-fashioned attitudes (reflective of the Old South) and Homer’s more modern one (reflective of the emerging New South).

    In this gothic story, though, perhaps the most vivid symbols are the locked room in Miss Emily’s house and the long iron-gray hair found on a pillow inside. The room symbolizes the secrecy and mystery associated with Miss Emily’s house and her relationship with Homer. The location of the hair as well as its color and length suggest a continuing interaction between Miss Emily and the corpse of Homer, again indicating her refusal to acknowledge the finality of death.

    No one had been in Emily’s house except for his servant Tobe. Emily during his life did not pay taxes ever since he met Colonel Sartoris simply because it was whispered by the past mayor that the city was indebted to her family. After the death of Homer, which the town people always thought that he had disappeared, there was a foul smell all around Emily’s house. The town people did not want an open confrontation with her and sorted to pour lime juice all over her property and with time the smell disappeared.

    In conclusion, the setting of this story was to explain the future generations and how they dealt with their legacy. This description helps us picture a decaying Mississippi town in the post-Civil War in the south. We are also able to see how Miss Emily resists change by all means. The room that was entered during Emily’s funeral helps to indicate the different physical details of the values, ideas and attitudes of the place in different times. Emily’s house was the only house that did not change while the others made theirs beautiful in the town.

    Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes! Turn and face the strange – Oh, hi there. Sorry about that. We were just singing along to David Bowie on our record player. Who''s David Bowie, you ask? What''s a record player?

    Okay, we get it. We try to be hip, but sometimes it''s nice to visit the past. We might break out our David Bowie records, or even pop his cool movie into our VCR. You know, Labyrinth ? The one where he played the Goblin King? Oh right, that was back in 1986.