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Spirit & Place Essays - WFYI

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: silvermeercat153 | Category: Research papers on interior design

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  1. author
    Бratz ブラッツ 18 Jan 2017 06:10

    Everything you ever wanted to know about the quotes talking about Dreams, Hopes, and Plans in A Raisin in the Sun, written by experts just for you.

  2. author
    Himikus 18 Jan 2017 00:11

    well to begin the essay give some information about the book so to start off with you can say (A Raisin In The Sun) is a play by Lorraine Hansberry that debuted on Broadway in 1959. The story is based upon a family's experience growing up in Chicago's Woodlawn neighbourhood. Then you can say the story explores..... To conclude the essay say A Raisin In The Sun is a story that reveals... between however many characters there is. It explores how.... It shows how..... Finally it reveals how...... KEY: ( ) = put in italics .... = Put in information This is what I did for my essay on Children of the Dust and I got 8.3/10 hope I helped Good luck

  3. author
    IG : LissDuek 18 Jan 2017 01:18

    BENEATHA ( Dropping to her knees )
    Well I do all right? thank everybody! And forgive me for ever wanting to be anything at all! ( Pursuing him on her knees across the floor ) FORGIVE ME, FORGIVE ME, FORGIVE ME! (1.1.123)

    Beneatha sarcastically apologizes for having dreams. To Walter, her dream seems kind of far-fetched. However, Beneatha is determined and she stands up to her brother for her right to want to become a doctor.

    Big Walter was never able to attain his dream. He still had hopes, though, that his children would have a chance to see theirs come true. This makes it even sadder when, both Beneatha''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s dreams of medical school and Walter''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s dreams of being a business owner are jeopardized (and possibly destroyed) by Walter''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s foolish business dealings with the Willy Harris.

    WALTER ( Suddenly bounding across the floor to embrace her )
    ‘Cause sometimes it is hard to let the future begin! (2.3.153)

    Walter s wife, Ruth, is in her early thirties. She is different from Lena in that she vocalizes her frustrations with her spouse, Walter. Ultimately, however, she seeks to please him, talking positively about the business to Lena on his behalf, encouraging Beneatha not to antagonize her brother so much, and being willing to work several jobs so that the family can afford to move into the new house.

    Beneatha, a young feminist college student, is the least tolerant of society s unequal treatment and expectations of women. Beneatha constantly challenges Walter s chauvinism, and has no time for shallow men like George Murchison , who do not respect her ideas. Through these three women, Hansberry skillfully illustrates how women s ideas about their identity have changed over time.

    A Raisin in the Sun explores not only the tension between white and black society but also the strain within the black community over how to react to an oppressive white community. Hansberry’s drama asks difficult questions about assimilation and identity. Through the character of Joseph Asagai, Hansberry reveals a trend toward celebrating African heritage. As he calls for a native revolt in his homeland, she seems to predict the anticolonial struggles in African countries of the upcoming decades, as well as the inevitability and necessity of integration.

    Hansberry also addressed feminist questions ahead of their time in A Raisin in the Sun. Through the character of Beneatha, Hansberry proposes that marriage is not necessary for women and that women can and should have ambitious career goals. She even approaches an abortion debate, allowing the topic of abortion to enter the action in an era when abortion was illegal. Of course, one of her most radical statements was simply the writing and production of the play no small feat given her status as a young, black woman in the 1950s.

    The environmental pressures are high: five people live in a tiny one-bedroom apartment, two families share a single bathroom, and the building is run-down and roach-infested. These pressures increase when Walter s wife, Ruth, finds out that she is pregnant for the second time, and begins seriously contemplating abortion. Yet even in an environment where a request for fifty cents becomes a family conflict, there is room for ideas and dreams.

    After having made the down payment on a house in a predominantly white neighborhood, Lena gives her oldest son responsibility over the rest of the insurance money, asking him to put away a significant portion for his sister s medical school education. To the contrary, Walter decides to invest all the money in the liquor store business with two men of questionable character. The plan falls through when Willy , one of the investors , runs away with all of the money.

    People of all backgrounds live in America and come to America dreaming of social, educational, economical opportunities as well as political and religious freedoms. Consequently, the notion of "The American Dream" has appeal and meaning to most of your students. Ask them to define "The American Dream" and you will probably become engaged in a lively discussion.

    Read the play A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry with your students and you can enhance your discussion of "The American Dream" even while you and your students explore how the social, educational, economical and political climate of the 1950s affected African Americans'' quest for "The American Dream."

  4. author
    yellowpeacock182 18 Jan 2017 05:31

    BENEATHA ( Dropping to her knees )
    Well I do all right? thank everybody! And forgive me for ever wanting to be anything at all! ( Pursuing him on her knees across the floor ) FORGIVE ME, FORGIVE ME, FORGIVE ME! (1.1.123)

    Beneatha sarcastically apologizes for having dreams. To Walter, her dream seems kind of far-fetched. However, Beneatha is determined and she stands up to her brother for her right to want to become a doctor.

    Big Walter was never able to attain his dream. He still had hopes, though, that his children would have a chance to see theirs come true. This makes it even sadder when, both Beneatha''s dreams of medical school and Walter''s dreams of being a business owner are jeopardized (and possibly destroyed) by Walter''s foolish business dealings with the Willy Harris.

    WALTER ( Suddenly bounding across the floor to embrace her )
    ‘Cause sometimes it is hard to let the future begin! (2.3.153)

    Walter s wife, Ruth, is in her early thirties. She is different from Lena in that she vocalizes her frustrations with her spouse, Walter. Ultimately, however, she seeks to please him, talking positively about the business to Lena on his behalf, encouraging Beneatha not to antagonize her brother so much, and being willing to work several jobs so that the family can afford to move into the new house.

    Beneatha, a young feminist college student, is the least tolerant of society s unequal treatment and expectations of women. Beneatha constantly challenges Walter s chauvinism, and has no time for shallow men like George Murchison , who do not respect her ideas. Through these three women, Hansberry skillfully illustrates how women s ideas about their identity have changed over time.

  5. author
    колочкин 18 Jan 2017 02:55

    BENEATHA ( Dropping to her knees )
    Well I do all right? thank everybody! And forgive me for ever wanting to be anything at all! ( Pursuing him on her knees across the floor ) FORGIVE ME, FORGIVE ME, FORGIVE ME! (1.1.123)

    Beneatha sarcastically apologizes for having dreams. To Walter, her dream seems kind of far-fetched. However, Beneatha is determined and she stands up to her brother for her right to want to become a doctor.

  6. author
    bigfrog654 18 Jan 2017 01:45

    BENEATHA ( Dropping to her knees )
    Well I do all right? thank everybody! And forgive me for ever wanting to be anything at all! ( Pursuing him on her knees across the floor ) FORGIVE ME, FORGIVE ME, FORGIVE ME! (1.1.123)

    Beneatha sarcastically apologizes for having dreams. To Walter, her dream seems kind of far-fetched. However, Beneatha is determined and she stands up to her brother for her right to want to become a doctor.

    Big Walter was never able to attain his dream. He still had hopes, though, that his children would have a chance to see theirs come true. This makes it even sadder when, both Beneatha''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s dreams of medical school and Walter''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s dreams of being a business owner are jeopardized (and possibly destroyed) by Walter''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s foolish business dealings with the Willy Harris.

    WALTER ( Suddenly bounding across the floor to embrace her )
    ‘Cause sometimes it is hard to let the future begin! (2.3.153)

    Walter s wife, Ruth, is in her early thirties. She is different from Lena in that she vocalizes her frustrations with her spouse, Walter. Ultimately, however, she seeks to please him, talking positively about the business to Lena on his behalf, encouraging Beneatha not to antagonize her brother so much, and being willing to work several jobs so that the family can afford to move into the new house.

    Beneatha, a young feminist college student, is the least tolerant of society s unequal treatment and expectations of women. Beneatha constantly challenges Walter s chauvinism, and has no time for shallow men like George Murchison , who do not respect her ideas. Through these three women, Hansberry skillfully illustrates how women s ideas about their identity have changed over time.

    A Raisin in the Sun explores not only the tension between white and black society but also the strain within the black community over how to react to an oppressive white community. Hansberry’s drama asks difficult questions about assimilation and identity. Through the character of Joseph Asagai, Hansberry reveals a trend toward celebrating African heritage. As he calls for a native revolt in his homeland, she seems to predict the anticolonial struggles in African countries of the upcoming decades, as well as the inevitability and necessity of integration.

    Hansberry also addressed feminist questions ahead of their time in A Raisin in the Sun. Through the character of Beneatha, Hansberry proposes that marriage is not necessary for women and that women can and should have ambitious career goals. She even approaches an abortion debate, allowing the topic of abortion to enter the action in an era when abortion was illegal. Of course, one of her most radical statements was simply the writing and production of the play no small feat given her status as a young, black woman in the 1950s.

    The environmental pressures are high: five people live in a tiny one-bedroom apartment, two families share a single bathroom, and the building is run-down and roach-infested. These pressures increase when Walter s wife, Ruth, finds out that she is pregnant for the second time, and begins seriously contemplating abortion. Yet even in an environment where a request for fifty cents becomes a family conflict, there is room for ideas and dreams.

    After having made the down payment on a house in a predominantly white neighborhood, Lena gives her oldest son responsibility over the rest of the insurance money, asking him to put away a significant portion for his sister s medical school education. To the contrary, Walter decides to invest all the money in the liquor store business with two men of questionable character. The plan falls through when Willy , one of the investors , runs away with all of the money.

    People of all backgrounds live in America and come to America dreaming of social, educational, economical opportunities as well as political and religious freedoms. Consequently, the notion of "The American Dream" has appeal and meaning to most of your students. Ask them to define "The American Dream" and you will probably become engaged in a lively discussion.

    Read the play A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry with your students and you can enhance your discussion of "The American Dream" even while you and your students explore how the social, educational, economical and political climate of the 1950s affected African Americans'''' quest for "The American Dream."

    ms-mcgregor | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

    eNotes.com is a resource used daily by thousands of students, teachers, professors and researchers. We invite you to become a part of our community.

  7. author
    ZerA 18 Jan 2017 08:49

    BENEATHA ( Dropping to her knees )
    Well I do all right? thank everybody! And forgive me for ever wanting to be anything at all! ( Pursuing him on her knees across the floor ) FORGIVE ME, FORGIVE ME, FORGIVE ME! (1.1.123)

    Beneatha sarcastically apologizes for having dreams. To Walter, her dream seems kind of far-fetched. However, Beneatha is determined and she stands up to her brother for her right to want to become a doctor.

    Big Walter was never able to attain his dream. He still had hopes, though, that his children would have a chance to see theirs come true. This makes it even sadder when, both Beneatha''''s dreams of medical school and Walter''''s dreams of being a business owner are jeopardized (and possibly destroyed) by Walter''''s foolish business dealings with the Willy Harris.

    WALTER ( Suddenly bounding across the floor to embrace her )
    ‘Cause sometimes it is hard to let the future begin! (2.3.153)

    Walter s wife, Ruth, is in her early thirties. She is different from Lena in that she vocalizes her frustrations with her spouse, Walter. Ultimately, however, she seeks to please him, talking positively about the business to Lena on his behalf, encouraging Beneatha not to antagonize her brother so much, and being willing to work several jobs so that the family can afford to move into the new house.

    Beneatha, a young feminist college student, is the least tolerant of society s unequal treatment and expectations of women. Beneatha constantly challenges Walter s chauvinism, and has no time for shallow men like George Murchison , who do not respect her ideas. Through these three women, Hansberry skillfully illustrates how women s ideas about their identity have changed over time.

    A Raisin in the Sun explores not only the tension between white and black society but also the strain within the black community over how to react to an oppressive white community. Hansberry’s drama asks difficult questions about assimilation and identity. Through the character of Joseph Asagai, Hansberry reveals a trend toward celebrating African heritage. As he calls for a native revolt in his homeland, she seems to predict the anticolonial struggles in African countries of the upcoming decades, as well as the inevitability and necessity of integration.

    Hansberry also addressed feminist questions ahead of their time in A Raisin in the Sun. Through the character of Beneatha, Hansberry proposes that marriage is not necessary for women and that women can and should have ambitious career goals. She even approaches an abortion debate, allowing the topic of abortion to enter the action in an era when abortion was illegal. Of course, one of her most radical statements was simply the writing and production of the play no small feat given her status as a young, black woman in the 1950s.

  8. author
    organicbutterfly466 18 Jan 2017 02:04

    BENEATHA ( Dropping to her knees )
    Well I do all right? thank everybody! And forgive me for ever wanting to be anything at all! ( Pursuing him on her knees across the floor ) FORGIVE ME, FORGIVE ME, FORGIVE ME! (1.1.123)

    Beneatha sarcastically apologizes for having dreams. To Walter, her dream seems kind of far-fetched. However, Beneatha is determined and she stands up to her brother for her right to want to become a doctor.

    Big Walter was never able to attain his dream. He still had hopes, though, that his children would have a chance to see theirs come true. This makes it even sadder when, both Beneatha's dreams of medical school and Walter's dreams of being a business owner are jeopardized (and possibly destroyed) by Walter's foolish business dealings with the Willy Harris.

    WALTER ( Suddenly bounding across the floor to embrace her )
    ‘Cause sometimes it is hard to let the future begin! (2.3.153)

  9. author
    silverbear176 18 Jan 2017 04:00

    see the quotations part of these study packs http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/raisin/ http://www.shmoop.com/intro/literature/lorraine-hansberry/a-raisin-in-the-sun.html

  10. author
    Эстер  🍀 17 Jan 2017 23:33

    BENEATHA (Dropping to her knees) Well – I do – all right? – thank everybody! And forgive me for ever wanting to be anything at all! (Pursuing him on her kneesacross the floor) FORGIVE ME, FORGIVE ME, FORGIVE ME! (1.1.123) From Shmoop Lit/Quotes and Thoughts on Dreams in A Raisin in the Sun

  11. author
    redbear531 18 Jan 2017 02:54

    Order essay here a raisin in the sun essay dreams

    GradeSaver offers study guides, application and school paper editing services, literature essays, college application essays and writing help.

  12. author
    crazytiger759 18 Jan 2017 06:35

    BENEATHA ( Dropping to her knees )
    Well I do all right? thank everybody! And forgive me for ever wanting to be anything at all! ( Pursuing him on her knees across the floor ) FORGIVE ME, FORGIVE ME, FORGIVE ME! (1.1.123)

    Beneatha sarcastically apologizes for having dreams. To Walter, her dream seems kind of far-fetched. However, Beneatha is determined and she stands up to her brother for her right to want to become a doctor.

    Big Walter was never able to attain his dream. He still had hopes, though, that his children would have a chance to see theirs come true. This makes it even sadder when, both Beneatha''''''''s dreams of medical school and Walter''''''''s dreams of being a business owner are jeopardized (and possibly destroyed) by Walter''''''''s foolish business dealings with the Willy Harris.

    WALTER ( Suddenly bounding across the floor to embrace her )
    ‘Cause sometimes it is hard to let the future begin! (2.3.153)

    Walter s wife, Ruth, is in her early thirties. She is different from Lena in that she vocalizes her frustrations with her spouse, Walter. Ultimately, however, she seeks to please him, talking positively about the business to Lena on his behalf, encouraging Beneatha not to antagonize her brother so much, and being willing to work several jobs so that the family can afford to move into the new house.

    Beneatha, a young feminist college student, is the least tolerant of society s unequal treatment and expectations of women. Beneatha constantly challenges Walter s chauvinism, and has no time for shallow men like George Murchison , who do not respect her ideas. Through these three women, Hansberry skillfully illustrates how women s ideas about their identity have changed over time.

    A Raisin in the Sun explores not only the tension between white and black society but also the strain within the black community over how to react to an oppressive white community. Hansberry’s drama asks difficult questions about assimilation and identity. Through the character of Joseph Asagai, Hansberry reveals a trend toward celebrating African heritage. As he calls for a native revolt in his homeland, she seems to predict the anticolonial struggles in African countries of the upcoming decades, as well as the inevitability and necessity of integration.

    Hansberry also addressed feminist questions ahead of their time in A Raisin in the Sun. Through the character of Beneatha, Hansberry proposes that marriage is not necessary for women and that women can and should have ambitious career goals. She even approaches an abortion debate, allowing the topic of abortion to enter the action in an era when abortion was illegal. Of course, one of her most radical statements was simply the writing and production of the play no small feat given her status as a young, black woman in the 1950s.

    The environmental pressures are high: five people live in a tiny one-bedroom apartment, two families share a single bathroom, and the building is run-down and roach-infested. These pressures increase when Walter s wife, Ruth, finds out that she is pregnant for the second time, and begins seriously contemplating abortion. Yet even in an environment where a request for fifty cents becomes a family conflict, there is room for ideas and dreams.

    After having made the down payment on a house in a predominantly white neighborhood, Lena gives her oldest son responsibility over the rest of the insurance money, asking him to put away a significant portion for his sister s medical school education. To the contrary, Walter decides to invest all the money in the liquor store business with two men of questionable character. The plan falls through when Willy , one of the investors , runs away with all of the money.

  13. author
    www.TUG.mn 18 Jan 2017 04:02

    BENEATHA ( Dropping to her knees )
    Well I do all right? thank everybody! And forgive me for ever wanting to be anything at all! ( Pursuing him on her knees across the floor ) FORGIVE ME, FORGIVE ME, FORGIVE ME! (1.1.123)

    Beneatha sarcastically apologizes for having dreams. To Walter, her dream seems kind of far-fetched. However, Beneatha is determined and she stands up to her brother for her right to want to become a doctor.

    Big Walter was never able to attain his dream. He still had hopes, though, that his children would have a chance to see theirs come true. This makes it even sadder when, both Beneatha''''''''''''''''s dreams of medical school and Walter''''''''''''''''s dreams of being a business owner are jeopardized (and possibly destroyed) by Walter''''''''''''''''s foolish business dealings with the Willy Harris.

    WALTER ( Suddenly bounding across the floor to embrace her )
    ‘Cause sometimes it is hard to let the future begin! (2.3.153)

    Walter s wife, Ruth, is in her early thirties. She is different from Lena in that she vocalizes her frustrations with her spouse, Walter. Ultimately, however, she seeks to please him, talking positively about the business to Lena on his behalf, encouraging Beneatha not to antagonize her brother so much, and being willing to work several jobs so that the family can afford to move into the new house.

    Beneatha, a young feminist college student, is the least tolerant of society s unequal treatment and expectations of women. Beneatha constantly challenges Walter s chauvinism, and has no time for shallow men like George Murchison , who do not respect her ideas. Through these three women, Hansberry skillfully illustrates how women s ideas about their identity have changed over time.

    A Raisin in the Sun explores not only the tension between white and black society but also the strain within the black community over how to react to an oppressive white community. Hansberry’s drama asks difficult questions about assimilation and identity. Through the character of Joseph Asagai, Hansberry reveals a trend toward celebrating African heritage. As he calls for a native revolt in his homeland, she seems to predict the anticolonial struggles in African countries of the upcoming decades, as well as the inevitability and necessity of integration.

    Hansberry also addressed feminist questions ahead of their time in A Raisin in the Sun. Through the character of Beneatha, Hansberry proposes that marriage is not necessary for women and that women can and should have ambitious career goals. She even approaches an abortion debate, allowing the topic of abortion to enter the action in an era when abortion was illegal. Of course, one of her most radical statements was simply the writing and production of the play no small feat given her status as a young, black woman in the 1950s.

    The environmental pressures are high: five people live in a tiny one-bedroom apartment, two families share a single bathroom, and the building is run-down and roach-infested. These pressures increase when Walter s wife, Ruth, finds out that she is pregnant for the second time, and begins seriously contemplating abortion. Yet even in an environment where a request for fifty cents becomes a family conflict, there is room for ideas and dreams.

    After having made the down payment on a house in a predominantly white neighborhood, Lena gives her oldest son responsibility over the rest of the insurance money, asking him to put away a significant portion for his sister s medical school education. To the contrary, Walter decides to invest all the money in the liquor store business with two men of questionable character. The plan falls through when Willy , one of the investors , runs away with all of the money.

    People of all backgrounds live in America and come to America dreaming of social, educational, economical opportunities as well as political and religious freedoms. Consequently, the notion of "The American Dream" has appeal and meaning to most of your students. Ask them to define "The American Dream" and you will probably become engaged in a lively discussion.

    Read the play A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry with your students and you can enhance your discussion of "The American Dream" even while you and your students explore how the social, educational, economical and political climate of the 1950s affected African Americans' quest for "The American Dream."

  14. author
    ticklishkoala145 18 Jan 2017 03:45

    BENEATHA ( Dropping to her knees )
    Well I do all right? thank everybody! And forgive me for ever wanting to be anything at all! ( Pursuing him on her knees across the floor ) FORGIVE ME, FORGIVE ME, FORGIVE ME! (1.1.123)

    Beneatha sarcastically apologizes for having dreams. To Walter, her dream seems kind of far-fetched. However, Beneatha is determined and she stands up to her brother for her right to want to become a doctor.

    Big Walter was never able to attain his dream. He still had hopes, though, that his children would have a chance to see theirs come true. This makes it even sadder when, both Beneatha''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s dreams of medical school and Walter''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s dreams of being a business owner are jeopardized (and possibly destroyed) by Walter''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s foolish business dealings with the Willy Harris.

    WALTER ( Suddenly bounding across the floor to embrace her )
    ‘Cause sometimes it is hard to let the future begin! (2.3.153)

    Walter s wife, Ruth, is in her early thirties. She is different from Lena in that she vocalizes her frustrations with her spouse, Walter. Ultimately, however, she seeks to please him, talking positively about the business to Lena on his behalf, encouraging Beneatha not to antagonize her brother so much, and being willing to work several jobs so that the family can afford to move into the new house.

    Beneatha, a young feminist college student, is the least tolerant of society s unequal treatment and expectations of women. Beneatha constantly challenges Walter s chauvinism, and has no time for shallow men like George Murchison , who do not respect her ideas. Through these three women, Hansberry skillfully illustrates how women s ideas about their identity have changed over time.

    A Raisin in the Sun explores not only the tension between white and black society but also the strain within the black community over how to react to an oppressive white community. Hansberry’s drama asks difficult questions about assimilation and identity. Through the character of Joseph Asagai, Hansberry reveals a trend toward celebrating African heritage. As he calls for a native revolt in his homeland, she seems to predict the anticolonial struggles in African countries of the upcoming decades, as well as the inevitability and necessity of integration.

    Hansberry also addressed feminist questions ahead of their time in A Raisin in the Sun. Through the character of Beneatha, Hansberry proposes that marriage is not necessary for women and that women can and should have ambitious career goals. She even approaches an abortion debate, allowing the topic of abortion to enter the action in an era when abortion was illegal. Of course, one of her most radical statements was simply the writing and production of the play no small feat given her status as a young, black woman in the 1950s.

    The environmental pressures are high: five people live in a tiny one-bedroom apartment, two families share a single bathroom, and the building is run-down and roach-infested. These pressures increase when Walter s wife, Ruth, finds out that she is pregnant for the second time, and begins seriously contemplating abortion. Yet even in an environment where a request for fifty cents becomes a family conflict, there is room for ideas and dreams.

    After having made the down payment on a house in a predominantly white neighborhood, Lena gives her oldest son responsibility over the rest of the insurance money, asking him to put away a significant portion for his sister s medical school education. To the contrary, Walter decides to invest all the money in the liquor store business with two men of questionable character. The plan falls through when Willy , one of the investors , runs away with all of the money.

    People of all backgrounds live in America and come to America dreaming of social, educational, economical opportunities as well as political and religious freedoms. Consequently, the notion of "The American Dream" has appeal and meaning to most of your students. Ask them to define "The American Dream" and you will probably become engaged in a lively discussion.

    Read the play A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry with your students and you can enhance your discussion of "The American Dream" even while you and your students explore how the social, educational, economical and political climate of the 1950s affected African Americans'''''''' quest for "The American Dream."

    ms-mcgregor | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

    eNotes.com is a resource used daily by thousands of students, teachers, professors and researchers. We invite you to become a part of our community.