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The Leonard Lopate Show - WNYC

18 Jan 2017 21:24 | Author: lazypeacock843 | Category: Why animals should have rights essay

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  1. author
    Л. Волколаков 18 Jan 2017 06:24

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    Pequot people (pronounced / ˈ p iː ˌ k w ɒ t / ) [2] are a tribe of Native Americans who inhabited much of what is now Connecticut in the 17th century. They were of the Algonquian language family, originally named Mohegans. They adopted the name Pequot after conquering most of Connecticut, although the Mohegan tribe also continued in the area now known as Norwich, Connecticut. The Pequot War and Mystic massacre reduced the Pequot''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s presence in southern New England.

    The Mashantucket Pequot Tribe of Connecticut are a federally recognized tribe as of 1983, the descendants of the historic Pequots. The Eastern Pequot Tribal Nation (EPTN) gained federal recognition in June 2002, but the State of Connecticut challenged and lobbied against their status. The Department of the Interior revoked the recognition in 2005, as they also did that year in the case of the Schaghticoke Tribal Nation of Connecticut. These were the first instances since the 1970s that the BIA had terminated federal recognition.

    The name Pequot is a Mohegan term, the meaning of which is in dispute among Algonquian -language specialists. Most recent sources claim that "Pequot" comes from Paquatauoq (the destroyers), relying on the theories of early 20th-century authority on Algonquian languages Frank Speck , an anthropologist and specialist of Pequot-Mohegan in the 1920s–1930s. He had doubts about this etymology, believing that another term seemed more plausible, after translation relating to the "shallowness of a body of water". [4]

    The Pequots and their traditional enemies the Mohegans were a single sociopolitical entity at one time. Anthropologists and historians contend that they split into the two competing groups sometime before contact with the Puritan English. [5] The earliest historians of the Pequot War speculated that the Pequots migrated from the upper Hudson River Valley toward central and eastern Connecticut sometime around 1500. These claims are disputed by the evidence of modern archaeology and anthropology finds. [6]

    In Carlyle''''''''s initial 1849 essay, Dr. Phelin M''''''''Quirk, the purported narrator, is naturally a fiction. Exeter Hall refers to the coalition formed in 1830s of liberal dissenting Christians active in the ending of slavery. The dismal science is, of course, economics -- in fact, the jeer makes its first appearance here. Quashee is a derogatory Caribbean term for a feisty black slave.

    A few historical facts may be worthwhile recalling here. The slave trade to the British colonies was abolished in 1807. After a vigorous campaign led by the abolitionist leader William Wilberforce, slavery itself was finally abolished in the British Empire in 1833. This was accomplished through a deal whereby slave-owners throughout the British Empire would receive some 」20 million in compensation plus they would be allowed to keep their slaves for an unpaid apprenticeship period of twelve additional years.

  2. author
    User1488237685 18 Jan 2017 00:38

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    Pequot people (pronounced / ˈ p iː ˌ k w ɒ t / ) [2] are a tribe of Native Americans who inhabited much of what is now Connecticut in the 17th century. They were of the Algonquian language family, originally named Mohegans. They adopted the name Pequot after conquering most of Connecticut, although the Mohegan tribe also continued in the area now known as Norwich, Connecticut. The Pequot War and Mystic massacre reduced the Pequot''''s presence in southern New England.

    The Mashantucket Pequot Tribe of Connecticut are a federally recognized tribe as of 1983, the descendants of the historic Pequots. The Eastern Pequot Tribal Nation (EPTN) gained federal recognition in June 2002, but the State of Connecticut challenged and lobbied against their status. The Department of the Interior revoked the recognition in 2005, as they also did that year in the case of the Schaghticoke Tribal Nation of Connecticut. These were the first instances since the 1970s that the BIA had terminated federal recognition.

    The name Pequot is a Mohegan term, the meaning of which is in dispute among Algonquian -language specialists. Most recent sources claim that "Pequot" comes from Paquatauoq (the destroyers), relying on the theories of early 20th-century authority on Algonquian languages Frank Speck , an anthropologist and specialist of Pequot-Mohegan in the 1920s–1930s. He had doubts about this etymology, believing that another term seemed more plausible, after translation relating to the "shallowness of a body of water". [4]

    The Pequots and their traditional enemies the Mohegans were a single sociopolitical entity at one time. Anthropologists and historians contend that they split into the two competing groups sometime before contact with the Puritan English. [5] The earliest historians of the Pequot War speculated that the Pequots migrated from the upper Hudson River Valley toward central and eastern Connecticut sometime around 1500. These claims are disputed by the evidence of modern archaeology and anthropology finds. [6]

    In Carlyle's initial 1849 essay, Dr. Phelin M'Quirk, the purported narrator, is naturally a fiction. Exeter Hall refers to the coalition formed in 1830s of liberal dissenting Christians active in the ending of slavery. The dismal science is, of course, economics -- in fact, the jeer makes its first appearance here. Quashee is a derogatory Caribbean term for a feisty black slave.

    A few historical facts may be worthwhile recalling here. The slave trade to the British colonies was abolished in 1807. After a vigorous campaign led by the abolitionist leader William Wilberforce, slavery itself was finally abolished in the British Empire in 1833. This was accomplished through a deal whereby slave-owners throughout the British Empire would receive some 」20 million in compensation plus they would be allowed to keep their slaves for an unpaid apprenticeship period of twelve additional years.

  3. author
    User1489470307 18 Jan 2017 05:54

    FAČR
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    Pequot people (pronounced / ˈ p iː ˌ k w ɒ t / ) [2] are a tribe of Native Americans who inhabited much of what is now Connecticut in the 17th century. They were of the Algonquian language family, originally named Mohegans. They adopted the name Pequot after conquering most of Connecticut, although the Mohegan tribe also continued in the area now known as Norwich, Connecticut. The Pequot War and Mystic massacre reduced the Pequot''''''''''''''''s presence in southern New England.

    The Mashantucket Pequot Tribe of Connecticut are a federally recognized tribe as of 1983, the descendants of the historic Pequots. The Eastern Pequot Tribal Nation (EPTN) gained federal recognition in June 2002, but the State of Connecticut challenged and lobbied against their status. The Department of the Interior revoked the recognition in 2005, as they also did that year in the case of the Schaghticoke Tribal Nation of Connecticut. These were the first instances since the 1970s that the BIA had terminated federal recognition.

    The name Pequot is a Mohegan term, the meaning of which is in dispute among Algonquian -language specialists. Most recent sources claim that "Pequot" comes from Paquatauoq (the destroyers), relying on the theories of early 20th-century authority on Algonquian languages Frank Speck , an anthropologist and specialist of Pequot-Mohegan in the 1920s–1930s. He had doubts about this etymology, believing that another term seemed more plausible, after translation relating to the "shallowness of a body of water". [4]

    The Pequots and their traditional enemies the Mohegans were a single sociopolitical entity at one time. Anthropologists and historians contend that they split into the two competing groups sometime before contact with the Puritan English. [5] The earliest historians of the Pequot War speculated that the Pequots migrated from the upper Hudson River Valley toward central and eastern Connecticut sometime around 1500. These claims are disputed by the evidence of modern archaeology and anthropology finds. [6]

    In Carlyle''''s initial 1849 essay, Dr. Phelin M''''Quirk, the purported narrator, is naturally a fiction. Exeter Hall refers to the coalition formed in 1830s of liberal dissenting Christians active in the ending of slavery. The dismal science is, of course, economics -- in fact, the jeer makes its first appearance here. Quashee is a derogatory Caribbean term for a feisty black slave.

    A few historical facts may be worthwhile recalling here. The slave trade to the British colonies was abolished in 1807. After a vigorous campaign led by the abolitionist leader William Wilberforce, slavery itself was finally abolished in the British Empire in 1833. This was accomplished through a deal whereby slave-owners throughout the British Empire would receive some 」20 million in compensation plus they would be allowed to keep their slaves for an unpaid apprenticeship period of twelve additional years.

  4. author
    Р. Вичин 18 Jan 2017 01:25

    Alfred George Gardiner (1865 – 1946) was a british journalist and author. His essays, written under the pen-name Alpha of the Plough, are highly regarded. He was born in Chelmsford, UK, and as a boy he worked at the Chelmsford Chronicle and the Bournemouth Directory. He joined the Northern Daily Telegraph in 1887. In 1899, he was appointed editor of the Blackburn Weekly Telegraph. Gardiner was editor of the Daily News from 1902 to 1915. Under his direction, it became one of the leading liberal journals its day, acting as a counterbalence to the conservative Daily Mail. He resigned over a disagreement with the paper s owners, who did not agree with his opposition to Lloyd George. From 1915 he contributed to the Star under the pseudonym Alpha of the Plough. His essays are uniformly elegant, graceful and humorous. His uniqueness lay in his ability to teach the basic truths of life in an easy and amusing manner. The Pillars of Society, Pebbles on the Shore, Many Furrows and Leaves in the Wind are some of his best known writings. http://library-2.lse.ac.uk/archives/handlists/Gardiner/Gardiner.html http://worldcat.org/identities/lccn-n50-15268 : Works by or about Alfred George Gardiner in libraries (WorldCat catalog)

  5. author
    Българска история 18 Jan 2017 07:23

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    Pequot people (pronounced / ˈ p iː ˌ k w ɒ t / ) [2] are a tribe of Native Americans who inhabited much of what is now Connecticut in the 17th century. They were of the Algonquian language family, originally named Mohegans. They adopted the name Pequot after conquering most of Connecticut, although the Mohegan tribe also continued in the area now known as Norwich, Connecticut. The Pequot War and Mystic massacre reduced the Pequot''''''''s presence in southern New England.

    The Mashantucket Pequot Tribe of Connecticut are a federally recognized tribe as of 1983, the descendants of the historic Pequots. The Eastern Pequot Tribal Nation (EPTN) gained federal recognition in June 2002, but the State of Connecticut challenged and lobbied against their status. The Department of the Interior revoked the recognition in 2005, as they also did that year in the case of the Schaghticoke Tribal Nation of Connecticut. These were the first instances since the 1970s that the BIA had terminated federal recognition.

    The name Pequot is a Mohegan term, the meaning of which is in dispute among Algonquian -language specialists. Most recent sources claim that "Pequot" comes from Paquatauoq (the destroyers), relying on the theories of early 20th-century authority on Algonquian languages Frank Speck , an anthropologist and specialist of Pequot-Mohegan in the 1920s–1930s. He had doubts about this etymology, believing that another term seemed more plausible, after translation relating to the "shallowness of a body of water". [4]

    The Pequots and their traditional enemies the Mohegans were a single sociopolitical entity at one time. Anthropologists and historians contend that they split into the two competing groups sometime before contact with the Puritan English. [5] The earliest historians of the Pequot War speculated that the Pequots migrated from the upper Hudson River Valley toward central and eastern Connecticut sometime around 1500. These claims are disputed by the evidence of modern archaeology and anthropology finds. [6]

    In Carlyle''s initial 1849 essay, Dr. Phelin M''Quirk, the purported narrator, is naturally a fiction. Exeter Hall refers to the coalition formed in 1830s of liberal dissenting Christians active in the ending of slavery. The dismal science is, of course, economics -- in fact, the jeer makes its first appearance here. Quashee is a derogatory Caribbean term for a feisty black slave.

    A few historical facts may be worthwhile recalling here. The slave trade to the British colonies was abolished in 1807. After a vigorous campaign led by the abolitionist leader William Wilberforce, slavery itself was finally abolished in the British Empire in 1833. This was accomplished through a deal whereby slave-owners throughout the British Empire would receive some 」20 million in compensation plus they would be allowed to keep their slaves for an unpaid apprenticeship period of twelve additional years.

  6. author
    BrownLudwig 18 Jan 2017 04:02

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    Pequot people (pronounced / ˈ p iː ˌ k w ɒ t / ) [2] are a tribe of Native Americans who inhabited much of what is now Connecticut in the 17th century. They were of the Algonquian language family, originally named Mohegans. They adopted the name Pequot after conquering most of Connecticut, although the Mohegan tribe also continued in the area now known as Norwich, Connecticut. The Pequot War and Mystic massacre reduced the Pequot''s presence in southern New England.

    The Mashantucket Pequot Tribe of Connecticut are a federally recognized tribe as of 1983, the descendants of the historic Pequots. The Eastern Pequot Tribal Nation (EPTN) gained federal recognition in June 2002, but the State of Connecticut challenged and lobbied against their status. The Department of the Interior revoked the recognition in 2005, as they also did that year in the case of the Schaghticoke Tribal Nation of Connecticut. These were the first instances since the 1970s that the BIA had terminated federal recognition.

    The name Pequot is a Mohegan term, the meaning of which is in dispute among Algonquian -language specialists. Most recent sources claim that "Pequot" comes from Paquatauoq (the destroyers), relying on the theories of early 20th-century authority on Algonquian languages Frank Speck , an anthropologist and specialist of Pequot-Mohegan in the 1920s–1930s. He had doubts about this etymology, believing that another term seemed more plausible, after translation relating to the "shallowness of a body of water". [4]

    The Pequots and their traditional enemies the Mohegans were a single sociopolitical entity at one time. Anthropologists and historians contend that they split into the two competing groups sometime before contact with the Puritan English. [5] The earliest historians of the Pequot War speculated that the Pequots migrated from the upper Hudson River Valley toward central and eastern Connecticut sometime around 1500. These claims are disputed by the evidence of modern archaeology and anthropology finds. [6]

  7. author
    ticklishdog149 17 Jan 2017 22:10

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    Pequot people (pronounced / ˈ p iː ˌ k w ɒ t / ) [2] are a tribe of Native Americans who inhabited much of what is now Connecticut in the 17th century. They were of the Algonquian language family, originally named Mohegans. They adopted the name Pequot after conquering most of Connecticut, although the Mohegan tribe also continued in the area now known as Norwich, Connecticut. The Pequot War and Mystic massacre reduced the Pequot''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s presence in southern New England.

    The Mashantucket Pequot Tribe of Connecticut are a federally recognized tribe as of 1983, the descendants of the historic Pequots. The Eastern Pequot Tribal Nation (EPTN) gained federal recognition in June 2002, but the State of Connecticut challenged and lobbied against their status. The Department of the Interior revoked the recognition in 2005, as they also did that year in the case of the Schaghticoke Tribal Nation of Connecticut. These were the first instances since the 1970s that the BIA had terminated federal recognition.

    The name Pequot is a Mohegan term, the meaning of which is in dispute among Algonquian -language specialists. Most recent sources claim that "Pequot" comes from Paquatauoq (the destroyers), relying on the theories of early 20th-century authority on Algonquian languages Frank Speck , an anthropologist and specialist of Pequot-Mohegan in the 1920s–1930s. He had doubts about this etymology, believing that another term seemed more plausible, after translation relating to the "shallowness of a body of water". [4]

    The Pequots and their traditional enemies the Mohegans were a single sociopolitical entity at one time. Anthropologists and historians contend that they split into the two competing groups sometime before contact with the Puritan English. [5] The earliest historians of the Pequot War speculated that the Pequots migrated from the upper Hudson River Valley toward central and eastern Connecticut sometime around 1500. These claims are disputed by the evidence of modern archaeology and anthropology finds. [6]

    In Carlyle''''''''''''''''s initial 1849 essay, Dr. Phelin M''''''''''''''''Quirk, the purported narrator, is naturally a fiction. Exeter Hall refers to the coalition formed in 1830s of liberal dissenting Christians active in the ending of slavery. The dismal science is, of course, economics -- in fact, the jeer makes its first appearance here. Quashee is a derogatory Caribbean term for a feisty black slave.

    A few historical facts may be worthwhile recalling here. The slave trade to the British colonies was abolished in 1807. After a vigorous campaign led by the abolitionist leader William Wilberforce, slavery itself was finally abolished in the British Empire in 1833. This was accomplished through a deal whereby slave-owners throughout the British Empire would receive some 」20 million in compensation plus they would be allowed to keep their slaves for an unpaid apprenticeship period of twelve additional years.

  8. author
    User1489090115 18 Jan 2017 06:11

    4019272601064 Der Herre Ist Nahe, Schola der Benediktinerabtei Gerleve 4562144211965 Kami Pani, Kamipani, Game O S T 9781424007813 142400781X Well Said, Linda Grant

  9. author
    User1485961398 17 Jan 2017 23:35

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    Pequot people (pronounced / ˈ p iː ˌ k w ɒ t / ) [2] are a tribe of Native Americans who inhabited much of what is now Connecticut in the 17th century. They were of the Algonquian language family, originally named Mohegans. They adopted the name Pequot after conquering most of Connecticut, although the Mohegan tribe also continued in the area now known as Norwich, Connecticut. The Pequot War and Mystic massacre reduced the Pequot's presence in southern New England.

    The Mashantucket Pequot Tribe of Connecticut are a federally recognized tribe as of 1983, the descendants of the historic Pequots. The Eastern Pequot Tribal Nation (EPTN) gained federal recognition in June 2002, but the State of Connecticut challenged and lobbied against their status. The Department of the Interior revoked the recognition in 2005, as they also did that year in the case of the Schaghticoke Tribal Nation of Connecticut. These were the first instances since the 1970s that the BIA had terminated federal recognition.